Ami’s take on EMAET


**Some Spoilers**
I like both the lead actors of the film and I’m partial to the rom-com genre- so it was pretty much a given that I was going to enjoy EMAET. And to be fair to the film- it is a much better effort than all the recent rom-coms such as IHLS, Break Ke Baad, Aisha and Anjaana Anjaani.

The film is refreshingly light both on melodrama and syrupy romance, Imran and Kareena have a surprisingly believable chemistry and the supporting cast of actors is excellently cast. The physical comedy in the film is funny without being crass, the music works well in context and the unconventional ending was lovely.

However- even though I enjoyed the movie as a piece of well-crafted fluff- I couldn’t help but feel bothered by it on some level. Films like Wake Up Sid!, Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara- and now Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu garner critical acclaim and are supposed to represent the ‘new, urban, smart, modern’ side of Bollywood.

Yet all of these so-called ‘meaningful, original’ films are incredibly limited in scope and they all operate in a completely cosmetic milieu that is extremely derivative of American popular culture (be it F.R.I.E.N.D.S, 500 days of summer, Sideways or whatever else).

And they all deal with the coming of age of poor little rich boys combining several of the more irritating tropes of Indie cinema such as the Manic Pixie Dream Girl, the man-child who refuses to grow up and the irritatingly entitled hipster whose myopic world view makes his trivial, juvenile trials seems gargantuan.

Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu is almost a caricature of this genre of supposedly intelligent cinema and it’s silly little excuse for a storyline makes Wake Up Sid’s plot appear Dickinesian in scope while its All-Americanized facade makes Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara look like a masala movie.

The central conflict of the film is Rahul’s terrible ill-treatment at the hands of his parents- they made him brush his teeth 3 times a day, he complains to the psychiatrist he visits in Vegas- in a moment that the filmmaker no doubt intended to look Woody Allen-esque. As the film proceeds we learn that his draconian parents also made him take golf lessons and instructed him to chew his food 32 times and they make him miserable by doing things like getting him an internship with a top architecture firm is Las Vegas and dragging him to see the opera while all he wants to do is be a photographer and have a relaxed family dinner.

Meanwhile, Riana- being a Manic Pixie Dream Girl- doesn’t really have a conflict. She is unable to pay her rent because she is too busy being Free-Spirited! to hold down a steady job (she is a ‘freelance hairstylist’) and her primary occupation is calling her jolly, liberal, Goan Catholic Mamma and Pappa in Mumbai whenever she has spent all their money and asks them to wire her some more ASAP. And naturally- this is the type of responsible adult role model that the film wants Rahul to learn from.

Given this plot- it is only natural that the film’s climax involves Rahul throwing a fit at his parent’s dining table in front of important guests and refusing to use the chopsticks to eat his sushi. After Rahul shocks the dinner party with his bad table manners, he storms off- we are told in his ending monologue that he has finally been able to escape his parental oppression and this is visually articulated by having him untie the tie that his father chose for him and throw it out of the car window (might I add that the car he is driving happens to be his father’s BMW?)

This is the kind of petulant fit that a five year old should be ashamed of throwing- and to have it presented as the triumph of a twenty five year old is just absurd. Yet- if some reputed reviewers are to be believed- this coming-of-age story apparently represents the coming of age of Bollywood itself!

139 Responses to “Ami’s take on EMAET”

  1. alex adams Says:

    Amy–wow, seems a wonderful writeup
    Havent read all of it to avoid spoilers

    U beat me 2 this movie–not showing near me
    and a bit busy with stuff to travel for this 1…
    actually dont mind the promos
    and the vibe

    If the lead was ANYONE but kareena, wouldve caught this..

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    • Thank you Alex 🙂 There’s no harm in watching the film- as I said it is better than MBKD, IHLS, BKB and the rest.

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      • After avoiding this film for a long time, I finally saw it yesterday. Choco-boy was surprisingly good here and Kareena was pleasing…The movie was far better than what I had expected…And yes Amit Trivedi’s numbers was the best thing about the film—But Ami your write-up is infinitely better than the film…For the first time I completely agree with your reading of the film

        ” After Rahul shocks the dinner party with his bad table manners, he storms off- we are told in his ending monologue that he has finally been able to escape his parental oppression and this is visually articulated by having him untie the tie that his father chose for him and throw it out of the car window (might I add that the car he is driving happens to be his father’s BMW?)”- You have nailed it Ami with this para…Exactly what I felt- I mean if this the standard manner of ‘coming-of-age’ , I am happy remaining a ‘man-child’

        “The central conflict of the film is Rahul’s terrible ill-treatment at the hands of his parents- they made him brush his teeth 3 times a day, he complains to the psychiatrist he visits in Vegas- in a moment that the filmmaker no doubt intended to look Woody Allen-esque. “— Ami this line of yours makes me want to watch Woody Allen’s rom-coms (i do not like this genre much anyway). I have only seen 2 of his films- Manhattan Murder Mystery and Match Point- and was never interested in watching any other film of his- But now probably I should give him a chance

        This was a great read Ami…u should write more

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        • Thank you Saurabh- my favourite Woody Allen film is of course Annie Hall- which you must see. I’m not a big Woody Allen fan- but I do love Annie Hall.

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          • Will keep Annie Hall in mind…BTW did u see any film recently which u liked and would recommend? And I still have not heard from you on GoW, Ishaqzaade etc

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  2. Check “Fireflies in the Garden”. It has interesting character studies on serious level.

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  3. alex adams Says:

    Amy–u must b tired writing this ‘skilful’ review lol
    Lets give u some respite
    🙂
    Good nite otherz

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  4. alex adams Says:

    and my type of innocent rom-coms
    enjoy folks

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  5. As another person who has a weak spot for romcoms, I agree this one surprised me and was much better in handling some of the common tropes(that’s really the way to look at these isn’t it). Yes, the rich boy, rich girl superficiality of Hindi cinema continues, but it was less offensive because it dealt with something irrational as love rather than something “life changing” a la ZNMD!

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    • I did enjoy the film as well- but the problem I had with it is the that Imran’s petty little tantrum is presented as a major break-through for him. I would have liked it far better if it had skipped the ‘coming-of-age’ nonsense and just focussed on being a slice-of-life rom-com.

      Kareena and Imran had great chemistry and their interactions were refreshing normal- but the whole track with Imran’s parents- which started off as secondary to their romance but eventually become the primary track- was so lacklustre.

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      • karankumar@comcast.net Says:

        Everything is relative. For a poor person Toyota is an expensive car. Others think BMW is affordable whereas Bentley is pricey. In this context, Imran’s storm in a tea cup was a major break through. For the first time he put his foot down. The ending keeps the option for a sequel open. Here is what I think :

        Kareena’s ex comes back (seeking a fresh start), saying that he finally went back to law school, got an education, but realized that what he is really missing in his life is Kareena. This, as everyone can CLEARLY see, calls for Aamir Khan, because paying a college student is his strong suit. Ofcourse with Aamir in this role, the doors automatically open to showing that while in school HE reforms education and also reforms the political dysfunction in Washington DC (law student, get it). HE also solves the Palestine/Israel conflict, all while also trying to woo back Kareena.

        With Aamir back, Kareena leans on her best friend Imran to help her in making this second attempt a success. So now Imran has to “help her” while doing everything he can to not loose her.

        A little of “My Best Freind’s Wedding”, a little of KKHH, a little 3I, and WALLAH you have a block busting with to die for casting, Aamir, Kareena and Imran.

        Now you want to know, who finally gets Kareena ? For that you have to see the third part. This is not going to be over till the formerly size zero lady sings.

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  6. This is a great read Ami.. thanks! Something good came out of the movie!

    I was never in danger of catching this in the theater but your review persuades me that I shouldn’t even risk it on DVD!

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    • Thank you Satyam. 🙂 It is honestly not that bad- its far better than most of what is coming out of Bollywood at the moment.
      Its perfectly enjoyable in a perfectly mindless way. Its only the final ‘showdown’ scene that really emphasizes the ridiculousness of the plot and makes you wonder about what you’ve watched.

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  7. Totally agree.
    It is harmless fluff but very unambitious. Not LOL funny but mildly enjpyable.
    I wont say it is better than BKB, IHLS or Anjana- Anjani. But at par.
    These films are not a reflection of progress in BW but of change. Some think all change is progress and get excited.
    ZMDB is better because of ZOYA’s capabiiies as a director are ten times those of others of similar ilk.
    I do find it hard to agree with this comment tho -‘far better than most of what is coming out of Bollywood at the moment. ‘ If your reference is to films like BG and Ready or DD and Rasclas, I dont think it is superior. Just different.

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    • Ami (formerly 'Annoyed') Says:

      I agree that Zoya’s directorial capabilities were the only thing that elevated ZNMD from the rest of this genre. Also agree that Bollywood seems to be confusing change with progress- excellent point there, But I have to disagree about these films being on par with the like of Rascals and Ready.

      For all of their lack of ambition, neither WUS nor EMAET really indulge in the misogyny, homophobia and vulgarity that the recent Dhawan/ Bazmee films do. The state of Bollywood today is that any film that doesn’t rely on the handicapped or the homosexual for ‘humour’ and attempt to sell itself primarily through sleazy item numbers automatically becomes ‘superior’ in my eyes.

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      • Point taken. But the boob squeeze action and Anusha’s character ( I think that was her name) and bum references here equally pointless and unfunny. Agree about the other offensive stuff not being there e.g homophobia , misogyny etc.

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        • Ami (formerly 'Annoyed') Says:

          I agree- Anusha’s character was so random! But I wonder if it was a deliberate inversion of gender stereotypes? There were other moments- like when they refer that iconic bit from When Harry Met Sally- expect Kareena is playing Harry’s part.

          I wonder if all of the women making aggressive sexual advances at Iran (there was the busi ess partner’s wife as well) were intended to be a subversion of the usual Hindi film trope where the woman is the constant target of harassment and molestation from a multitude of villains. But I’m most probably over thinking it. 😛

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    • I saw it on Friday and found it better mainly as stated in the review that it is void of “dharmatised” drama for once. Decent film but like Rajen says entirely unambitious, just a light breezy entertainer. Actually liked Kareena here as although her character was a free spirit, she was not loud or crazy or annoying like JWM. Imran was quite wooden which suited him as his character was wooden pretty much

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  8. I am not sure why it is set in Las Vegas tho. Other than the drive by wedding chapel, there is no LV in it. Even the town square didnt appear to be the Vegas town square. The guy who played Kareena’s dad was a natural.

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  9. Ami (formerly 'Annoyed') Says:

    BTW- I really appreciated some touches like the conversation that Rahul and Riana had where she tells him about her shattered dreams as well as the fact that her whole family was crazy and care-free. It humanised her and explained her quirky, happy-go-lucky nature- so I felt she was a better developed, less one-dimensional character than most Manic Pixie Dream Girls. I also really liked how they didn’t get a conventional happy ending- it made sense that a woman like Riana wouldn’t want to commit to a man like Rahul at that point in her life.

    In comparison- Laila from ZNMD was such a frustrating character- there was no explanation for her positivity and optimism or her inexplicable desire to save Hrithik from himself and no scenes that showed that her as anything expect a perfect ideal of a bohemian woman and then suddenly the incongruous ending song where she gets married to Hrithik despite being a free-spirited, globe-trotting college student. She was a completely stupid character and a pure figment of male fantasy- but ironically created by two women.

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  10. Re:a pure figment of male fantasy- but ironically created by two women.

    I hate to break it to you but even in real life females are moe guilty of pandering to male fantasies and not neccesarily out of lac of choice or as victims. This is the power women enjoy over men.

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    • Ami (formerly 'Annoyed') Says:

      It’s different when a woman is doing it as a personal choice. But when 2 presumably intelligent women are making a movie in an industry that suffers from any kind of remotely strong or well-developed female characters- it is sad to see that all the female characters in the film are so stereotypical.

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  11. Ami (formerly 'Annoyed') Says:

    BTW- saw a few films on the plane last week:

    Warrior- this is really not the kind of film that I usually enjoy watching- heavy on dramatically charged action sequences and sports movie cliches- but Tom Hardy’s performance was so compelling that I did get engaged in the film

    It’s not a film that I wholeheartedly loved- but it was worth watching for sure. And if you are a fan of the genre- you will most probably love it. It did make me a big Hardy fan though- he is so talented (and attractive!)

    50/50- definitely the superior seriocomic effort when compared to The Descendants- sad to see it’s getting ignored at most award ceremonies. Joseph Gordon-Levitt is endearing, his bromantic chemistry with Seth Rogen is surprisingly believable and Anjelica Huston makes an impact even though she is stranded with a thankless role.

    But the standout performance for me was Anna Kendrick- she is such an intensely charming actress and she is up there on my list of girl crushes along with Marion Cotillard, Emma Stone, Melanie Laurent and Tina Fey.

    I could have really done without the cheating girlfriend though- she was such a needless straw(wo)man of a character.

    But overall- one of my favourite films this year, and definitely one of the best scripts of the year- infinitely superior to the idiotic Midnight in Paris script which will most probably win the Oscar.

    Films that I am yet to watch- Young Adult, Martha Marcy May Marlene, Melancholia, Carnage. Any recommendations?

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  12. argh–still catching up work after all that partying fri/sat…
    Escaped watching EMET tonite
    lotsa young female demographic mad to watch this film, even if one has to drive a lot..
    Somehow couldnt get myself to drive so much to see Kareena @ the end of the day..ooops
    Anyhwo got my valentines socialising done n dusted –what a relief lol

    “Any recommendations?”
    Amy—have u seen vicky christina barcelona”
    I found it quite interested but am a bit hesitant recommended it to v v young crowd–lest they get ‘spoilt”
    Have a sense of responsibility, u know 🙂

    Anyone who gets a chance to see VCB–do lemme know what u think
    sure to bring up interesting discussion and takes

    PS–Gud 2 see mentions of marion cotillard and melanie laurent
    btw scarlett J (as usual) and rebecca hall were quite good
    But then my tastes are not necessarily agreeable to all
    🙂

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  13. alex adams Says:

    on a serious note–
    Spring 1941 is a good watch–may get too intense though for some
    Joseph Fiennes is sublime as ever
    but warnin–some may find it disturbing. To be watched in the correct frame o mind

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  14. Utkal Mohanty Says:

    Just back from Ek Main Ekk Tu. And I am quite impressed. Hindi film writing is really growing up and keeping pace with changing times. This one pushes the envelope further in trying to break the stereotype of man-woman relationship depicted in our films and succeeds in capturing the nuances of specific characters and specific relationships. Of course a lot of it is Hollywood inspired, but hen a lot of the changes in gender equations happening in our society has been triggered by the West too.
    Coming to the film, the first ten minutes I was kind of exasperated: Why do I have to suffer the tale of another cute young couple based in Las Vegas? But slowly I was drawn to these two characters, who were real, going through a relationship whose transition was mapped with sensitivity and charm by this talented first-time director, Shakun Batra. The locale did not matter anymore. I was drawn in to what was happening in this young couple’s minds. The performances, the writing and the music carried you along without melodrama or story twists. The humour was gentle and in character. And by the the time the post-interval portion kicks in, you are really concerned. Hereis this boy, falling hopelessly falling in love, slowly changing to met her expectations,, only to learn that she does not really love him in that way. What can be more heart-breaking? The scene at the secret kissing spot in Riya’s old school is perfectly staged and Imran gives it all he has got.
    The scene where Riya offers to give Rahul a hug even after being accused of giving him the wrong signal is the kind of detailing of relationship contour that differentiates Shakiun Batra’s film from other new-age Bollywood rom-coms. These new young crop of directors like Ayan Bannerjee, Zoya Akhtar, Anand rai, Manish Sharma and now Shakun Batra are daring to show us that there are many shades of intimacy and attraction and affection possible between the tying of rakhi and getting into a Roop Tera Msstana kind of uncontrollable sexual passion.
    I liked the economy of Shakun Batra’s directorial language. He never stretches a scene to long, never tries to squeeze too hard to wring every drop of comic or emotional juice out of a scene. Sample: When Riya’s father tries to assure Rahul , a little petrified of their dog Shery by saying, “ Darn kya, just tickle his balls.” , we get the character. We get the character. There si no attempt at staging many more such gags. The lightness of touch is also apparent in the way Shakun Batra punctuates a scene of strong dramatic significance and impact like when Rahul bursts out at the august assemblage of his father’s business friends and families with is mother ( Ratna Pathak) exclaiming. “ Ab chopsticks nein kya burai hai?” He just harmonizes this with the little boy in glasses discarding his chopsticks and starting to eat with his hands a few minutes later.
    Shakun Batra’s comic touches are also subtle, controlled and executed with precision. The scenes where Riya’s granny enters as Rahul was unzipping, or when Ratna Patahk bumps into Rahul on the road are examples.
    Contrary to what many viewers have remarked, the film has a rich emotional core. And since all the characters, including Riya’s sister, brother-in-law, father and mother as well as Rahul’s father and mother are sketched so affectionately, one can’t really blame anyone for the predicament of Riya and Rahul, except just accepting the fcat that that;s thw way tings go when it comes to affairs of the heart.

    AS I have mentioned the performances , the writing and the music are first rate. Songs like Gubbare and Aahatein play in your head, creating pleasant buzz. The jazzy background score is very effective too. Imran has grown so much as a performer and he is just perfect for the roled. But the film really belongs to Kareena, who has played a completely different variation on her vivacious Geet from Jab We met. I have always believed the true mark of a great actor is when one can play subtle variations of a seemingly repitituve character. ( Just the way Aamir plays the student in three different films, DCH, RDB and 3 Idiots in totally different keys.). To me that’s like an artist who can paint five different shades of yellow that one who can just paint red, blue and yellow. Of course it helps that her character has been written well, with all the details filed in. She is a wannabe ballet dancer making do with a hairstylist’s job. She has two broken teeth and a steel bal in her ankle joint ( Main defective product hoon, she says. ) Hers is an inspired performance and she has never loked more beautiful. If I was impressed by the aggression nad raw sexuality of Vidya Blan in The Dirty Picyitre , I am no less impressed by Kareena’s expression of a beautiful mind, and a warm, caring heart ,and a super confident personality through an appropriate physical projection Ek Main Aur Ekk Tu. Mark this performance out for nominations at all the award functions next year as also the music of Amit Trivedi and the writing of Shakun Batar and Ayesha DeVitre.
    A beautiful film releasing at the right time, it is sure to please St Valentine and all those who concern themselves with the affairs of the heart .

    Like

    • LOL! Utkal you remain as predictable and easy to please as ever! You make a perfect case study for the malady afflicting the multiplex audiences in india who seem to be in an unseemly hurry to transform Bolywood into Hollywood. As a film this is ‘perfectly average’ as Kareena would say and rather pedestrian.

      Like

    • Ami (formerly 'Annoyed') Says:

      It’s funny that you mention the boy eating sushi with his hands as a positive thing- for me that was the single thing that most articulated the depressingly unambitious, wafer thin nature of the film’s central conflict.

      It is basic table manners that one does not eat sushi with one’s hands- especially in a formal dinner setting. This is the kind of thing that most grown men are aware of- and the fact that Rahul’s mother needed to remind him of it indicates his own immaturity and dependance on his parents and not (as the filmmakers intended) the overbearing, bullying nature of his mother.

      Where WUS wins over EMAET for me was that in WUS the boy realised that he was immature and needed to grow up and worked on repairing his relationship with his parents. In EMAET- Rahul’s lack of happiness in life has to do largely with his own dependance and spinelessness but the filmmaker shifts the completely blame onto his parents.

      Again- a very competent piece of fluff- but in my eyes- hardly worthy of even a fraction of the hyperbolic praise you are bestowing upon it here.

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      • alex adams Says:

        btw i just LOVE rich guys who refuse to grow up (whether in WuS or in EMET now)
        yippee 😉
        hope we all refuse to “grow Up”

        ps–the artist seems to have creamed the BAFTAs
        wo was going gaga over the artist here?
        ps2-liked dujardins acceptance speech

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        • Ami (formerly 'Annoyed') Says:

          LOL Alex I cannot stand man-children (or woman-children). There is a difference between being childlike and childish- one is endearing and desirable and the other is embarrassing and irritating.

          I thought that the Kareena’s character in this film was adorably childlike while Imran’s character grew very exasperatingly childish towards the end of the movie.

          And I’ve loved all of Dujradin’s acceptance speeches so far. That man is so charming.

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  15. alex adams Says:

    utkal uncle–good writeup–trust your reviews a lot
    balls–if u had written this a couple of hours ago–wouldve gone for it
    am surprised U have like it
    infact U saw it first weekend lol

    after reading your review, somehow feel this movie may infact be worthwhile
    The other problem is my extreme antipathy to kareena
    get an allergic reaction from her…

    btw noticed this cliched catholic/christian placement
    eg y did kareenas ‘free spirited’ character to be a braganza from goa…

    would be worthwhile hearing your views on Vicky christina barcelona, utkal uncle
    have u seen war horse/ grey? its between these two for the next for me…

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  16. Utkal Mohanty Says:

    Alex, Kareena is wonderful in EMAET and is sure shot at the awards ceremonies next year. She has redefined ‘ beautiful’ in Bollywood lexicon with this film.

    As for Vicky, Christina, Barcellona, it is wonderful. AS I have mentioned somewhere the three or four directors whose any film I can watch any number of tomes are , and a DVD of whose films I will pick up without knowing anything about it are Hitchcock, Ray and Woody Allen ( Only Mani Rtanam among the current Indian filmmakerss in that list) Of course, these guys have made bad and not so great films. But VCB is among the beeter works of Allen. And the star cast is crackling. Javier Bardem, Scarlet Johnason, and Penelope Cruz just set the screen on fire. The opening scene posted by you here really sets the tone of the film. Rivetting stuff. I guess as a film in totality, Midnight in Paris is a shade better.

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  17. alex adams Says:

    “As for Vicky, Christina, Barcellona, it is wonderful…..the three or four directors whose any film I can watch any number of tomes are , … Hitchcock, Ray and Woody Allen ( Only Mani Rtanam among the current Indian filmmakerss in that list”
    Utkal Uncle: have most trust and regards for your views on various blogs (other than satyam probably)
    Im a bit perplexed the way Woody Allen handled a grey complex human interaction subplot such effortlessly and with so much panache
    Actually i dont consider this below midnite in paris
    (maybe better in some respects)
    Would be worthwhile getting your detailed take on these two esp VCB
    VCB has infact rekindled the desire amongst a few friends to make a small indie movie…
    Over a round of drinks, ive been offered a role..
    🙂 by a friend who watched VCB wiht me and who occasionally makes indie (european) stuff, just as a hobby
    Cant spare time enblock for amateur activities though
    and dont have time to learn spanish/ portuguese..
    lemme stop here lol

    but utkal uncle:do post some detailed thoughts when u can

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  18. alex adams Says:

    “She has redefined ‘ beautiful’ in Bollywood lexicon with this film. “–cmon utkal uncle–pray tell me u r joking..
    Dont expect this from u , arrgh

    ALso would be worthhile to get your views on “inglorious Basterds” (and melanie Laurent)

    Somehow u remind me of Fabrice Luchini, in a good way… 🙂
    u r a v bright man–r u interested in acting btw

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  19. Utkal Mohanty Says:

    “She has redefined ‘ beautiful’ in Bollywood lexicon with this film. “–cmon utkal uncle–pray tell me u r joking.

    No, I am not. The problem with me is that I do not have any pre-conceived notions about anybody, actor or director or composer or writer. I just respond honestly to what I see or hear.

    Karen has been very irritating in the past. She was a disaster in bikini in Tashan. But with Jab We Met, 3 idiots and now this she has established her acting abilities and charisma without a shade of doubt.

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    • She looked fine in Bikini except her head was too big for her body..Where was the scope of acting in 3 Idiots? JWM was fine but then it was same screaming from top of lungs which Kajol and Anushka do all the time.

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  20. Utkal Mohanty Says:

    Where was the scope for acting in # Idiots? The problem is , many thing acting as doing all sorts of stuff, like crying , shouting or making faces. acting is about playing a character and Kareena did a fine Neha ( Ia m using the name from % Point Someone) . and no it was not the same screaming as Kajol and Anushka. She WAS Geet in JWm. and what creaming of Kajol and Anushka you are referring to? Anushka was good in RNBDJ and brilliant in BBB>

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    • “The problem is , many thing acting as doing all sorts of stuff, like crying , shouting or making faces. acting is about playing a character and Kareena did a fine Neha ”
      I am pretty sure even a non-actor Deepika and Katrina would have been able to do that role without much problem. With time most people become comfortable in front of camera. That is why people who are termed wooden at start of career suddenly start getting acting epithets.

      “Anushka was good in RNBDJ and brilliant in BBB>”
      I guess we see with different prisms what is acting!

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      • alex adams Says:

        agree that most actors get better n most comfy with the camera
        As for Anushka–feel she is a good actress given her limited experience and unconnected background
        But she lacks grooming n poise as of now-may change though
        But she can act and is not fake–infact a ‘good’ girl (check out her discomfiture in ricky bahl bikini)
        Deepika wasnt bad in aarakshan -perhaps the onlt film she acted
        SHe suffers from a conflicted/ confused personality which shows on the screen..

        Satyam said somewhere about Kareena which is true imo–long ago she was (wrongly) convinced she had nothing to learn in acting….
        Though her ‘face’ is enuf to irritate me (no reason) lol

        as for katrina, she shouldnt be discussed amongst “actors”
        though she made heroic advances in mere Bro
        Nargis fakhri is a better instinctive actress than katrina and more than people give her credit for..
        her obvious lack of knowledge of the language/ diction/training and the ‘beginners’ awkward body language confused many about her ‘zero” acting skiils–know nobody will agree here though but still… 😉

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  21. alex adams Says:

    “She looked fine in Bikini except her head was too big for her body..Where was the scope of acting in 3 Idiots? JWM was fine but then it was same screaming from top of lungs which Kajol and Anushka do all the time.”
    haha agree munna–well said
    Actually kajol and anushka are not too bad–atleast they are somewhat nuanced
    The real twin screecho is Karisma
    These sisters are everything womanhood should NOT be.
    actually actingwise these two are not bad–infact kareena is a v good actress–but all that is immaterial…
    My irritation with her is so xtreme that cant articulate it
    Actually think of it —her head is too big for anything
    infact….

    that reminds of an MMS of a drunk kareena/ her lookalike making out wiht shahid which went viral..
    that perverted (sic!) pic of her doesnt go out of mind!!!
    now guys–dont hit the search engines..

    ps1–utkal uncle–rate the VCB actresses plz

    ps2–bafta coming on bbc

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  22. alex adams Says:

    still watching the (deferred live) baftas 2012 on bbc –streep wins–not a fan of this performance though… a celebration of alzheimers..and stephen fry is such a boring host!!!!

    Baftas 2012: The Artist biggest winner with seven awards including best filmSilence is golden for French film, while Meryl Streep wins best actress and John Hurt honoured for oustanding contribution

    Share 10 reddit this Mark Brown, arts correspondent
    guardian.co.uk, Sunday 12 February 2012 22.08 GMT Article history
    The Artist’s dream team: leading man Jean Dujardin, producer Thomas Langmann and director Michel Hazanavicius. Photograph: Dave Hogan/Getty Images
    There were no spoken words, vibrant colours, impressive special effects, sophisticated plotlines or indeed anything at all that audiences expect in a modern film, and that was all very much in its favour as The Artist emerged triumphant at the 2012 Baftas.

    The French silent film had been the bookies’ favourite to sweep all before it and it did not disappoint, winning seven awards including best film, best director, best original screenplay, original music, best costume design, best cinematography.

    The Artist’s tally of Baftas equalled the number given to The King’s Speech last year and Slumdog Millionaire in 2009. Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid still holds the record with nine, followed by The Killing Fields with eight.

    Picking up the screenplay award, The Artist’s director, Michel Hazanavicius, said: “I’m very surprised, because so many people thought there was no script because there was no dialogue. So English people are very clever. Congratulations to you.”

    The film also won the best actor prize for Jean Dujardin – although Gary Oldman as George Smiley had been widely tipped.

    Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy instead won best British film and best adapted screenplay. Writer Peter Straughan joked: “I would like to thank The Artist for not being adapted from a book.” He said the award was for his late wife and co-adapter, Bridget O’Connor, who died before the film was completed – “she wrote all the good bits, I made the coffee.”

    There was no surprise whatsoever in the best actress category. Meryl Streep had been a banker to win for her scarily good portrayal of Margaret Thatcher in The Iron Lady and she did win – only her second lead actress Bafta win after The French Lieutenant’s Woman more than 30 years ago.

    Streep said she was very proud of the film and thanked the producers for “asking and expecting so much of me.”

    Christopher Plummer, now 82, won best supporting actor – his first Bafta – for his moving portrayal of a late developing gay man in Beginners. Kenneth Branagh, Jim Broadbent, Jonah Hill and Philip Seymour Hoffman lost out.

    Octavia Spencer won the best supporting actress award for her role as the hard-nosed, badly abused maid Minny in The Help, the film’s only award of the night after five nominations.

    Hugo, Martin Scorsese’s loving celebration of cinema, won best production design and sound.

    In the British debut category, actor-turned director Paddy Considine and producer Diarmid Scrimshaw won for the gruellingly brilliant Tyrannosaur, made for just £750,000.

    The well-liked Formula One film Senna won the award for best documentary and best editing. The producer, Eric Fellner, said: “This film was made by all of us with love and all we have got back from it is love.”

    In other categories, Rango won best animated film and Pedro Almodóvar won the best film not in the English language category for his macabre thriller The Skin I live In.

    Harry Potter was nominated in four craft categories and won one – finally winning best special visual effects award with the final instalment of the franchise.

    The evening however belonged to a charming silent film with a cute dog and simple plot, made 85 years after The Jazz Singer heralded the arrival of talkies.

    The film debuted to terrific reviews at Cannes last May and the momentum has just continued and continued, winning three Golden Globes and is also now nominated for 10 Oscars.

    Having said that, The Artist was not to all tastes. The Odeon in Liverpool confirmed it gave refunds to some cinemagoers annoyed to find the film was silent. Kim Novak complained they used music from Vertigo, although taking out a full page advert in Variety and accusing the film of “rape” was over the top by any standards.

    Most of the thank you speeches at the Royal Opera House were mercifully short. Frenchman Ludovic Bource, winning the best original music award for The Artist, concluded his with: “I love Britain. God save the Queen.”

    The only award voted for by the public was the rising star award sponsored by Orange. It went to Hackney rapper Adam Deacon who wrote, directed and starred in the film Anuvahood.

    John Hurt was given a special outstanding contribution to British cinema award, following in footsteps that include Derek Jarman, Mike Leigh and Kenneth Branagh, and last year the Harry Potter series of films.

    His career has included memorable performances as Quentin Crisp in The Naked Civil Servant, John Merrick in The Elephant Man and Kane, the chest-bursting executive officer in Alien. Last year he was Control in Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy.

    Accepting the award from Billy Bob Thornton, Hurt said he had written a speech but his wife told him not to give it, that he should simply say “thank you” – which he did, albeit slightly more effusively than she’d advised.

    Bafta’s highest accolade, a fellowship, went to Martin Scorsese who had been nominated for two films last year: his nostalgic family drama Hugo and his documentary on George Harrison, Living in a Material World.The award was given for a lifetime of films that have included Taxi Driver, Raging Bull and The Departed. Tim Corrie, the chairman of Bafta, said: Martin Scorcese is a legend in his lifetime; a true inspiration to all young directors the world over. We are delighted to honour his contribution to film history.”

    Like

  23. alex adams Says:

    Anil Kapoor accepts the award for the “skin i live in”…

    Berlinale update
    http://www.young-germany.de/life-in-germany/life-in-germany/article/bollywood-comes-to-the-berlinale.html

    Amy–40 cumments in a day–welldone
    lets goto bed now 😉

    Like

  24. alex adams Says:

    Bachna Ae Haseeno

    Being addicted to multitasking, saw bits of ‘bachne ae haseeno” along wiht baftas 2012
    Didnt think BeH deserved a solo vieweing lol
    must say–better/ ‘deeper” than expected

    Ranbir does well…oops…even bipasha is ok
    deepikas taxi driver act…
    think will say more on this…

    was forced to check the credits of BeH
    When i see the name of aditya chopra in the credits, im not surprised–this guy knows his job!!!!
    Suspect this movie may have been written for a bigger star maybe srk??

    Like

  25. Very well written, Ami!

    I’m not the kind to venture into a Johar-backed film, least of all a rom-com, but your review puts an end to any chance I had of watching another ‘coming of age’ saga from KJO. In Johar’s world, if a rich kid learns how to brush his teeth, that’s ‘coming of age’.

    I could only sit through 30 mins of WUS and swore myself off of KJO’s directorial hands, ever since I had the pleasure of watching K3G!

    Like

    • Thank you Saket 🙂 I quite enjoyed the film- but if you couldn’t get through WUS you’re best off staying far away from this one. The coming-of-age theme was dealt with far more maturely in WUS than in EMAET. 😛

      Like

    • karankumar@comcast.net Says:

      Saket

      In the communist world the pain of the rich is no pain.

      Like

      • ‘Pain’ has to be more precisely defined. There is nothing in my world of ‘pain’, nothing at all that can compare with those who hunt for food on garbage heaps in Bombay, who go to the bathroom on the very same garbage heaps once it’s dark. These might seem like extreme examples but this is the common fate of millions in a country like India, let alone around the world. There are not more people who can afford multiplexes in India than there are those who cannot afford more than the food off garbage dumps. But consider how the the reality of the former is always much more specifically defined in political, social, economic terms while that of the latter is just available as a great abstraction.

        So all kinds of ‘pain’ isn’t comparable. yes we are necessarily limited by our own life-experiences. That’s fine. But we sometimes glibly use language as if things were self-evident. They’re anything but this.

        Like

        • https://satyamshot.wordpress.com/2012/02/03/abhishek-in-prakash-jhas-chakravyuh/#comment-131012

          check out some of the images in the original piece here.. some of these folks are supposed to be living above the poverty line. It seems to be such miserable squalor and yet there are those far worse off.

          Like

        • Actually, I feel quite flattered that my not-so-humble comments bring out a fresh wave of McCarthyism among certain people. Seriously!

          Like

          • While it is true that a large percentage of India’s population is impoverished- this is not a demographic that is going to be depicted on Bollywood screens anytime soon- unless it is a callous and disrespectful depiction as in the case of an Agneepath (the 2012 one).

            But even within the privileged world of the Bandra/Sobo elite that EMAET, WUS, ZNMD and the like deal with- real problems can be represented. You can be Donald Trump’s son eating Michelin-starred sushi from Nobu or a middle class guy eating supermarket sushi- either way having parents who insist on proper table manners is not going to cause you any kind of substantial pain. No matter how privileged and mollycoddled you’ve been- these are not issues that are going to seriously upset you.

            There are so many substantial themes that can be examined even within the rose-scented bubble that these guys (and a lot of us as well) live in. For instance- even the staple Hindi film character: the young man who comes back home after studying abroad and takes up his father’s business- can be turned into something meaningful: he can be portrayed as a naive, idealistic man who is gradually disillusioned by the corruption in the system and is suddenly sensitive to the inequality and hierarchy in the country now that he has returned from a foreign land with a different perspective.

            His character arc could deal with how he cannot make peace with the fact that he is a part of this system now and eventually quits to do something that is truly more meaningful. It would be so much more substantial that the usual treatment where the boy finds the family business boring and so he quits to do something ‘arty’ and fun without ever questioning his entitlement at having all of these choices in the first place and the repercussions that his career will have on his lifestyle and financial situation and so on.

            Or if you take a relationship like Kabir and Natasha’s in ZNMD- it could be used to explore the changing gender norms in relationships in young, urban India and how the clash of more traditional mindsets vs. more liberal ones causes tension instead of just reducing Natasha to a one-dimensional shrew who can conveniently be dumped at the end of the film. Both sides can be depicted in a sympathetic, non-judgemental manner and the relationship arc can be drawn out more maturely.

            Even if you’re making a glossy, aspirational film- there are so many possibilities to make it something more than just fluff. It can be light and fun and it doesn’t need to touch upon dark themes like poverty or abuse- but it can still be more meaningful than this stuff which the critics in India go so ga-ga over.

            Like

          • Well said (again), Ami! It isn’t the order or the ‘status’ of the problem I object to, it’s the nature…

            Like

          • karankumar@comcast.net Says:

            Ami

            Eating with one’s hand is only a major issue in Britain. In US we have a whole categories of food called finger foods. We even have rules, such as the one against double dipping. On any given evening at Nobu, one of the finest Sushi joints in NYC, you will see plenty of people eating Sushi with their fingers (maybe not the whole platter but definitely some pieces).

            In the movie the character was rebeling against his parent’s authority, as well as colonial shackles. It is a little more profound than the credit you give to that scene.

            Like

          • karankumar@comcast.net Says:

            Saket

            McCarthyism ? You are clearly just throwing around words.

            Firstly there is no witch hunt going on here. But beyound that lets address, “Who is oppressing whom here ?”

            You mock rich people’s pain and I AM the oppressor ? How is that possible ?

            Therefore, if I am not oppressing you or conducting a witch hunt, then how is this McCarthyism ?

            Clearly you are just throwing around words.

            Like

        • karankumar@comcast.net Says:

          Satyam

          I am nor debating which categories of pain is acceptable. I don’t want to disect pain. For me all pain is pain. I feel your pain. I feel even a communist’s pain. I feel everyone’s pain, BUT do you feel my pain ? Do you equally feel the pain of my people ? If yes, why do you mock it ? All pain is pain. Don’t be selective in appreciating and understating some pain.

          Like

          • And I am saying I want to be selective because all pain is not the same at all! and I think it reprehensible on moral grounds to call all of it the same. Of course I don’t define things in this way — communist’s pain or right-winger’s pain or whatever!

            Like

          • karankumar@comcast.net Says:

            Satyam

            The pain of hunger is aweful. But is the pain of isolation or neglect any less ?

            With due respect, what right do you have to impose your morality ? How are you or any communist any different than the Taliban ? I respect your morality and of all others. But your morality (or mine) is a personal demon, hence don’t project that on others. At a macro level we need to respect all and sympathize with everyone’s pain.

            Like

          • First of all I am not a communist. Secondly I think it inadvisable for you to throw these words around when quite clearly you lack a proper understanding of what these things mean.

            As for imposing my morality on others I am doing just the opposite. I am not indulging in the obscenity of thinking that my ‘pain’ is the same as that of those who live and sleep next to the tracks (the actual tracks!) on Calcutta train stations. It is obscene to pretend that pain is relative in these circumstances. Fortunately the men in my family have not been brutalized and murdered in civil wars, the women of my family have not been gang-raped (this happens in India every day.. one doesn’t have to go very far), I have not been dispossessed of land and property, so actually I find it rather easy to say that my pain is not comparable to that of those with whom all of this has happened. So let’s quit this obscenity of pretending it’s all relative.

            “The pain of hunger is aweful. But is the pain of isolation or neglect any less ? ”

            those who have not known hunger make such statements!

            Like

          • LOL! Rebelling against colonial shackles! You really think that rejecting a JAPANESE eating implement to eat a japanese meal with is ‘rebellion against colonial shackles’ ?

            This is an industry where the selling point of most movies is either plenty of songs with white women gyrating in bikinis or a hot, new, white actress/ item girl that is meant to pander to the post-colonial fetish of the Indian male while re-enforcing the inferiority of Indian looks/ brown skin- you really think these guys are going to make movies about ‘rebelling against colonial shackles’?

            And I suppose the way to best achieve this ‘rebellion against colonial shackles’ is to make the most Westernized rom-com possible.

            I’m sorry but that comment really made me laugh!

            Like

          • karankumar@comcast.net Says:

            Ami

            You have moved away from discussing “just a scene” to something broader. We can do that (respectfully might I add). But that is a separate debate. Let’s finish this one first.

            Like

          • Ami (formerly 'Annoyed') Says:

            Karankumar- I’m still discussing the scene- just elaborating on the reasons due to which I find your interpretation of that scene ridiculous. We could finish the debate- but seeing that we are at cross purposes- I think it’s best that we agree to disagree. 🙂

            And sorry if my comment offended you- that wasn’t the intention- I was genuinely amused at the idea that the scene was meant to showcase a rebellion against colonial shackles. And I don’t mean that as a personal insult against you- it’s just that I find the presence of such themes highly improbable in the shallow cinematic universe that Shakun has created.

            But anyway- I feel like this debate is becoming futile since we’re clearly not seeing eye-to-eye. Because if you’re asking me to respect the ‘problems’ that Rahul faces in the movie, I find that absurd. Again- not insulting you, just pointing out how different our viewpoints are which is why we should stop dragging this debate out.

            Peace.

            Like

          • karankumar@comcast.net Says:

            Satyam

            I am not calling you a communist. Although I am definately saying in communist domain such thoughts are common.

            Just like you state that ONLY THOSE, I am saying ditto. If one see such pain first hand, neither hunger nor isolation would be discounted. I am discounting nothing.

            I am puzzled that we are having this debate because there is no unit to measure pain. Short of a unit, is it not wise to consider both “painfully”.

            Like

          • “I am puzzled that we are having this debate because there is no unit to measure pain. ”

            There isn’t a unit to measure stupidity either!

            Like

          • karankumar@comcast.net Says:

            Ami

            The movie is only as shallow as you want it to be. The cup is half full, you see it as half empty.

            Like

          • karankumar@comcast.net Says:

            Saket

            You have a habit of throwing words around. Feel free to insult while you cannot debate.

            Like

          • karankumar: I’m sorry. That was inappropriate.

            I don’t wish to debate with you because there are fundamental differences between your outlook and mine.

            Like

          • @karankumar

            >Rebelling against colonial shackles!

            You mean eating with fingers will do that?
            What about the whole idea of the film and other such films?

            I think one colonial shackle is fast giving way to a more dangerous colonial shackle/americanisation, a passive one which is making people insensitive about their own situation, and making them into the greatest wannabes found anywhere in the world.

            Like

          • karankumar@comcast.net Says:

            Oldgold

            It is just a movie, it is meant to entertain. But yes, the “substance” is there like a shot of anti oxidants in your sugary sweet smoothie.

            Now please don’t say anything negative about America. As it is, as you can see, I am not well liked here. But PLEASE don’t bite the very hand that feeds you. We make free trade happen (we put food on your table). We give you cheap medicine, and you still remain ungrateful. But that is another debate. Let’s just stick to EMAET.

            Like

          • @karankumar
            >We make free trade happen (we put food on your table). We give you cheap medicine,

            LOL!! I think you have to rephrase it;
            We put *fast food* in your mouth and spoil your health, then we supply you with medicine. LOL!
            You sure live in some fantasy world.

            And yes, Ami has it right when she explained it to you in a comment below that I meant differently.

            Like

          • karankumar@comcast.net Says:

            Oldgold

            All traditional food, in excess, is bad for your health. One reason is that our lifestyes have changed, we dont work from dawn to dusk anymore. Our less active lifestyle requires a different diet today. But this is not about one’s choice of food. Also equating “food on the table” to just fast foods is a very narrow and cynical response. It needs to be said that your response is very disrespectful, I am dissapointed in you.

            I don’t want to discuss te greatness of America in this thread, but I WILL say that we are the engine that drives the world.

            This is about EMAET.

            Like

          • >but I WILL say that we are the engine that drives the world.

            LOL! Just as SRK still rules Bollywood?

            Never mind the thread being of EMAET, discussions always meander.

            Like

        • Poverty and happiness don’t go hand in hand. In spite of all material wealth, west goes to east, to find that peace and happiness.

          Like

        • “India’s population is impoverished- this is not a demographic that is going to be depicted on Bollywood screens”
          At the end of the day it is filmmaker’s vision, no? If the filmmaker belongs to SoBo (which majority of them do) then K3G will be their reality. So in the end, we need film makers who come from “real” india not just SoBo.

          Like

          • Ami (formerly 'Annoyed') Says:

            Di- That’s what I am saying- these filmmakers don’t have to depict the poor or small town Indians- even within their SoBo/ Bandra milieu- they can make far more meaningful films.

            And the idea that the impoverished are happy in India is some exotic mirage. No one is happy starving, begging, being trafficked into child labour/ prostitution, living on the street and facing all kinds of abuse/ exploitation. That’s a very disturbingly dismissive/ patronizing attitude to take towards the abject poor.

            I’m not saying that rich people are automatically happy- but you can hardly compare the sufferings of a corporate drown to that of a man/ woman who does not have the means to afford basic food or potable water. I think that any remotely privileged person who tries to equate their suffering to that of a person who does not have a proper roof over their head and cannot afford even 3 meals a day or to a person who has faced violent abuse is just lacking in basic human empathy. (This is relating back to the comparison between isolation and starvation elsewhere on this thread).

            And as for people from the West travelling to India to find happiness- that is just a very small demographic of backpackers and hippies- Westerners are hardly travelling to India enmasse in search of nirvana nor are the majority of them sitting in their first world comfort and yearning for the spiritual salvation of the east.

            Like

          • Ami (formerly 'Annoyed') Says:

            *corporate drone

            Like

          • ‘Rock On’ is an example of a film that again pitches itself for the multiplex crowd, but its sense (and connection) to ‘loss of innocence’ is quite genuine.

            Like

          • Ami: Somehow this discussion reminds me of the scene in 3 idiots, where the (poor) mother who is making roti scratches the chest of ailing father and a hair gets stuck to the belon (my all time fav scene in recent times)…it was so very hilarious. I fell off my chair laughing. I like depiction of this kind of “poverty”…doesn’t make me uncomfortable in my ivory tower cushy chair.
            If we are going to see movies, we don’t want to be disturbed by what is swept underneath the carpet and scenes of misery,hunger, pain. The most pain we would like to see is when Ranbir capoor is sufferring the street food in grungy clothes to bring that “dard” in his songs that ultimately makes him into Rockstar.. 😉
            OR when hero rebels with hands instead of using fork/knife/chop sticks.

            Like

          • Ami (formerly 'Annoyed') Says:

            Agree about Rock On! But I think that Luck By Chance is the better example of a privileged filmmaker making a movie about the privileged milieu that she inhabits and still making it far richer and more memorable than most multiplex fare. I know that most people on this blog will not agree- but I thought that was a very good film.

            Like

  26. Hey i have to take offence of u including 500 days of summer here my dear! thats insane!!

    its a classic, and i am very much attached to it, it doesnt deserve a place among the pack u have placed it into!

    Like

    • Rooney- I’m not including 500 Days of Summer with these movies- I’m including it in the American popular culture references that these movies are inspired by/ derive from. I put it along side Sideways (which is a far finer film that 500 IMO) so its in very good company. 🙂

      Like

  27. Ami (formerly 'Annoyed') Says:

    “The movie is only as shallow as you want it to be.”

    No it’s not as shallow as I want it to be. So by your twisted logic- I can read Salman Rushdie and Chetan Bhagat and derive the same amount of meaning and depth out of them- because I want it equally in both cases.

    Or I can watch Persepolis and then watch Twilight and see the cup as half full in both cases- so both movies will be equally meaningful.

    Like

    • karankumar@comcast.net Says:

      Ami

      I can parse Salman Rushdie and Chetan Bhagat and show them to be shallow also. Life is what you make of it. Why then not give a scene the benefit of he doubt. Remember, “The magic” happens to those who believe in magic.

      Like

  28. The debate here has taken an unintentionally funny turn secondary to usual culprit(s).
    Re: Actually, I feel quite flattered that my not-so-humble comments bring out a fresh wave of McCarthyism among certain people. Seriously!

    Saket,
    Do you want to take responsibility for ther bunch of idiotic comments that followed as well??? LOL.
    On a serious note, you guys have no idea of the pain suffered by a rich girl when here LV bag gets stolen or a rich boy who misplaces his Ray Ban sunglasses or a rich businessman has a flat in his Ferrari. All pain is equal unles you are a communist! Ahhh, you guys are just insesnitive to the angst of the poor rich people.

    Like

    • “Do you want to take responsibility for ther bunch of idiotic comments that followed as well???”

      Tu hi baaki rah gaya tha…teri kami thi..woh aab puri ho gayi.

      Ami, Karan are having fun. Don’t take it so seriously bro.

      Like

  29. Tho, seriously Ami’s point is – fair enough if the film is about a young man trying to break free from his oppressive parents but there are better ways of showcasing his rebellion than his refusal to use a fork instead of chop sticks.

    Like

    • Karan…You are insanely phunny. Welcome to this blog, dude. I know there are many haters but ignore all of them.
      Keep writing what you write (though pl. don’t harass satyam so much…alex/me/ami is OK).

      Like

      • not harassed at all! But yes I do lack patience to keep responding to certain kinds of stuff beyond a point.

        Obtuseness can be an enormous problem with some.

        Like

      • karankumar@comcast.net Says:

        Di

        No desire to harass anyone. I just present my peressctive, which one may or may not agree with. Someone’s agreement or disagreement does not influence my views, I just call it the way I see things.

        If you don’t agree make your case. You have an equal chance to convince me.

        Like

  30. BTW, is it just Chinese who mix up the ‘r’s and the ‘l’s or Japanese too?

    Like

  31. A good review. Even while enjoying the film you do not ignore the other side.
    I’m with satyam and all those against glorifying the pain of poor rich boys/girls. If that means I’m a communist…fine. There’s something good in every system, even communism 😉

    The film people all come from the film world and know nothing but riches.

    Earlier the film world had people struggling in life with common/normal jobs. Dilip Kumar worked n a canteen, Johny Walker was a bus conductor and so on. The writers, directors all came from simple backgrounds. They could show things removed from the glitter and glamour of the film world.

    I expect no better from these present day film makers.

    Like

    • Ami (formerly 'Annoyed') Says:

      Thank you Old Gold. 🙂 The thing is- even the film world is not such a Utopian place. Infect it’s probably far sleazier than the milieus that most of us inhabit. Until even 5 years ago the Mumbai underworld were major financiers of most films. Even today sexual abuse of women is very prominent in the industry.

      Its not that these filmmakers live in some alternate universe where the biggest existentialist question they will ever face is chopsticks or fork- they are just too incapable/ unambitious
      to create anything more meaningful. And perhaps it is the audiences fault too. After all- films like Do Dhoni Char or Rocket Singh flop while these ‘coming of age’ films are not only commercial successes but also critically acclaimed.

      Like

      • Re: After all- films like Do Dhoni Char or Rocket Singh flop while these ‘coming of age’ films are not only commercial successes but also critically acclaimed.

        I would put the blame largely on the audience. DDC and Rocket Singh are good examples but there are countless more. It is unreasonable to think that we have any right to tell people what they should like and what they shouldnt but when I see the audiences ( and critics) lapping up this kind of light and somewhat enjoyable but ultimately lame stuff, it makes me wonder. And, to top it they believe by patronisin g this kind of films they are helping Bollywood’s casue and its progress.

        Like

        • “It is unreasonable to think that we have any right to tell people what they should like and what they shouldnt”

          this is a fair point and much as I attack/lament certain choices on the part of the audience I am always reflecting on larger cultural trends and so on when I do this.

          Like

    • Alex adams Says:

      Oldgold
      Pray tell us about your ‘valentine’ related activities
      Also did these things exist during the times of dilip kumar and Johny walker
      Plz give a first hand account from that era vis a vis now
      We can only read bout it-u have experience that era
      Respect 🙂

      Ps -Di -ultimately didn’t even taste the ‘Malabar king meal’
      Found it an exercise in futility
      Applause 😉

      Like

      • >Pray tell us about your ‘valentine’ related activities

        A couple of years ago I read that the ‘valentinian’ activities are mostly popular in the US and UK. (now India 😉 ) The percentage on the continent is low.
        In the supermarket I frequent, there was a stand of cat food with Saint Valentino written all over. 😀
        Of course with the florists section having a few hearts hanging around.
        It’s mosty the ‘fasnacht’ stuff around with witches and monsters and robinhood and masks everywhere, not forgetting the crisp sweet sugary concoctions eaten at this time which I love.

        Like

      • “Pray tell us about your ‘valentine’ related activities”
        Y R U always interviewing others for their best kisses, their valentine activities…now pray tell us, what your v-activities R? Do you have any girlfriends (real ones not the imaginary ones like N.F)? Any plans of getting marred soon? We have a list of songs (bollywood ones of course) we will sing in your sangeet partay.

        Like

        • Alex adams Says:

          Omg :Di is deadly ..run 🙂
          These things like marriage r the domain of the domesticated n docile like Satyam et al
          Oops sorry Satyam 😉

          I am a self appointed (selfstyled) interviewer/ surveyor/student of life !!!
          😉

          Btw Oldgold : lots of SRK fans in fasnacht Poland and germany, isn’t it!!! 🙂

          Like

          • Alex adams Says:

            Poor Satyams wife regularly scams even his blog to see what all he is upto
            He can’t even ‘express’ his real self on his OWN blog
            Oops think I should stop here 🙂

            Cmon Di -what are u upto for valentines (any parties for yourselves or your kids) lol

            Like

          • “Poor Satyams wife regularly scams even his blog to see what all he is upto”

            think all the wives want to know whether we’re friends with Alex or not. That usually determines the level of trouble we’re in..

            Like

          • In Poland he’s bigger than John Paul II and Lech Walesa, in Germany he’s giving Bismarck a run.

            Like

          • “think all the wives want to know whether we’re friends with Alex or not. That usually determines the level of trouble we’re in..”
            Satyam…what are you getting your wife and kids this valentine’s day?
            🙂

            Like

        • You’re not getting off this easily Alex 🙂 We want some lists- since you are always asking us for ours- what are your favorite hindi romantic songs/ movies? Actually this is a question for everybody on the blog- appropriate for V day.

          Like

      • “ps -Di -ultimately didn’t even taste the ‘Malabar king meal’
        Found it an exercise in futility”
        So typical..rich people only can waste malabar/expensive meals. I would have you call those kiddos and have fun watching them eat your food instead of it going waste. What a pity!

        Like

  32. Alex adams Says:

    Argh still busy with dotting the ‘I’s and crossing the ‘t’s
    Joined late but credit to amy for inciting a worthy debate

    Anyhow
    Misery is fine as long as you know how to get out of it when you want to
    Money can’t buy you happiness but can buy u a more pleasant form of misery.
    But even in this dictum there is an ‘even out’…

    Somehow Reminds me of my (only) recent trip to the Kerala backwaters
    Sat one day across the most exotic and elaborate ‘malabar’ King meal or something like that it was called…
    Across saw a bunch of poor kids fight over a handful of sweets .
    Soon they realised the futility and shared em.
    The utter elation and pleasure with which they consumed them infront front of my eyes –felt so satiated that didn’t need to even touch the ‘king’ meal…

    Like

    • “Sat one day across the most exotic and elaborate ‘malabar’ King meal ”
      rolling my eyes at spoilt rich kids of this world. So how was the road trip across the Europe? And how was the king meal.
      😉
      and some people think that znmd characters were make believe…!!

      Like

      • Alex adams Says:

        Haha Di 😉
        No cumments there
        Check out the brochure of one of the ‘yoga society ‘
        Camps ( any goto)

        Yoga in the scenic countryside national park
        Acres to xplore
        Lotsa pubs in the evenings
        Massage as well…

        Like

      • Alex adams Says:

        ‘the Malabar meal’

        Don’t wanna trivialise this ‘Malabar meal’ so will finish it off now though didn’t wanna share it initially
        To be v candid
        The ‘ guilt’ coupled with my ‘apathy’ to the supposed nature of the exotic ‘meal’ ( enuf for a couple of families and for one person??) especially right infront of the obvious deprivation didnt allow me to eat ( as would to many people)

        My immediate impulse was to call those kids to my ‘houseboat’ and let em have a party
        But I didn’t wanna give my humble self this false sense of exalted ‘higher ground’ in the eyes of those kids and most importantly my own… For something as ‘easy’ as this and for something which has nothing to do with my ‘goodness’

        Ultimately in this ‘conflict’ ended up doing -well err, nothing -walked away…
        That’s the curse of the passive inertia laden ‘gaze’

        Incidentally that’s the subject of one of my many musings/ short vignettes Ive been toying with …for a short handheld camera amateur indie film (for myself..)
        Am planning to shoot this particular one in Lithuania or Greece though (depending on logistics and my travels)

        Like

  33. Alex adams Says:

    Taking of misery of rich/poor or whatever
    C’mon folks -rise above these petty classifications
    Talk at the ‘human’ level:-)

    In an obtuse way, only today was taking to a colleague who is Czech
    She told me of a word I’ve been grappling with ..

    ‘litoste’
    Not only is this untranslatable-it is difficult to imagine how anyone can understand it without it
    Many writers hav tried to play with these words
    But the closest they got to it is-
    ” a state of agony and torment created by the sudden sight of ones own misery'”
    Think this is getting a bit misplaced in an EMET thread
    Gotta wrap up my work… 😉

    Like

    • Am not sure if it is spelt with an ‘e’ at the end.

      Like

      • Alex adams Says:

        Lots of stuff in European languages when ‘translated’ into English changes.
        In Czech there is an inherent duality eg s automatically becomes ‘sh’ but since that corresponding notation doesn’t exist in English, it is disregarded as in ‘litost’

        Anyhow unrelated but maybe worth reading from Milan Kundera

        “Litost is an untranslatable Czech word. Its first syllable, which is long and stressed, sounds like the wail of an abandoned dog. As for the meaning of this word, I have looked in vain in other languages for an equivalent, though I find it difficult to imagine how anyone can understand the human soul without it.”
        —Milan Kundera, The Book Of Laughter And Forgetting

        Kundera gives an example of a boy who cannot swim very well, while his girlfriend is a strong swimmer. The boy struggles to keep up with her as she swims off beyond him, and when she returns, the outraged boy slaps her face. By slapping her, he projects his incompetency as though it is her fault.
        “She was madly in love with him and tactfully swam as slowly as he did. But when their swim was coming to an end, she wanted to give her athletic instincts a few moments’ free rein and headed for the opposite bank at a rapid crawl. The student [the boy] made an effort to swim faster too and swallowed water. Feeling humbled, his physical inferiority laid bare, he felt litost. He recalled his sickly childhood, lacking in physical exercise and friends and spent under the constant gaze of his mother’s overfond eye, and fell into despair about himself and his life. They walked back to the city together in silence on a country land. Wounded and humiliated, he felt an irresistible desire to hit her.…and then he slapped her face.”

        Litost is, essentially, a guilt trip through actions; by aggravating someone via verbal actions, physical actions, and sometimes silence. There are layers to Litost. The ultimate form of Litost, Kundera explains is, “circuitous revenge…the indirect blow.” Kundera writes, “Litost is a state of torment created by the sudden sight of one’s own misery.”

        Kundera writes that love is a remedy for misery, and that all faults are redeemed by love’s gaze. “Love’s absolute,” Kundera says,
        “is actually a desire for absolute identity: the woman we love ought to swim as slowly as we do, she ought to have no past of her own to look back on happily. But when the illusion of absolute identity vanishes (the girl loks back happily on her past or swims faster), love becomes a permanent source of the great torment we call litost.”

        I think this ties in nicely to the (positive) idea of most monotheistic religions, in which no matter your state of being, God is said to be along side you, loving you eternally; God will not try and out-swim you either. However, this also creates a subconscious (or conscious) inferiority, which is apparent that though God is swimming along with the individual, the individual must at one point stop swimming at the risk of drowning from fatigue. This is the flaw, though God will be alongside the individual, the individual knows God, being perfect, can outperform the individual in every aspect of life. Thus, a feeling of litost is brought upon the individual again.

        Like

  34. “Now please don’t say anything negative about America. As it is, as you can see, I am not well liked here. But PLEASE don’t bite the very hand that feeds you.”

    Err…I’m pretty sure that OG was the superficial westernization/ appropriation of American culture present in Indian movies and NOT about America or its culture itself.

    Like

  35. Alex adams Says:

    Watching the live (deferred) Grammys red carpet
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2100478/Grammys-2012-Whitney-Houstons-death-casts-shadow-Awards.html?ito=feeds-newsxml

    Wtf is that–Niki minaj wearing -obnoxious

    Like

  36. Alex adams Says:

    Man, too much adele in the Grammys just like the ‘artist’ overload in baftas
    Also loads of Whitney tributes amongst the mentions of crack cocaine … Anyhow RIP

    Gud nite folks–No foursomes tonite Amy/Di/OG !!
    Need some work to sort out (burnin midnite oil types) and moreover need to let u get on with your v-day activities (of your own/your kids)
    All the best-lemme me know updates 😉
    Ps know u take my jokes in the right spirit -cheers

    Like

  37. “It needs to be said that your response is very disrespectful, I am dissapointed in you.”

    LOL! OG- why did you have to go be so disrespectful? Now Karan Kumar is disappointed in you! How will you ever live with yourself after this? 😉

    Like

    • Strange. I don’t see this response of karan anywhere. Were you just ..expecting this response, Ami? 😉
      Anyway. I was stating a fact, fan or not a fan. In fact I’m more of a fan because I remain one even in his bad times 🙂 unlike many who join the bandwagon when success comes.

      Like

      • PS: …and I’m a fan because I **liked** the films of his which I saw, and **not because** of any BO/#1 etc etc

        Like

        • Ami (formerly 'Annoyed') Says:

          OG- this was part of his response re:disrespecting America with the fast food comment- not about being SRK’s fan. 🙂 Look further up thread to where you commented on America putting fast food on our tables.

          Like

  38. Alex adams Says:

    Finally – on v day-Amy -u asked for some songs-2begin with Some current flavour song(s)

    And check out these lines —courtesy google

    Udti hui titalli(butterfly) ki rangeen parchayi
    Reh jaati hai phoolon mein
    Waise hi tum ik tasveer ke jaise
    Chahye ho inn aankhon mein

    Wow

    Back to work finally…

    Sent from my iPad

    Like

  39. An interesting discussion.

    The difference is that we laugh at rich man’s pain while we cry at poor man’s pain.

    If the one can eat dosas, idlis and rotis with forks and knives, what is wrong in eating sushi or noodles with hands?

    As for this movie.

    This movie is strictly for TV audience. It does not need a theatre.

    Kareena was trying to look and act like a wise Buddha which irritated me no end.

    I loved Imraans’s outbursts on two occasions. One at Kareena’s school. And another at the dining table. I feel he can portray an angry kashmiri or a terrorist with a cause. A new side to him. And no more romcoms.

    Imraan was a wee bit better better than Kareena atleast in this movie.

    Like

  40. Alex adams Says:

    What do u do when a German gifts u a Bollywood film- u feel the power of Bollywood
    What what happens when it turns out to be a subtitled Kal ho na ho!!!
    😉
    Shudder

    Like

  41. Utkal Mohanty Says:

    I was wondering, how did this first-time directior manage to pull off sucha mature treatemnt, which I frankly found streets ahead of folks like Farhan Akhtar, Zoya akhtar or Ayan Mukherjee ( some of the directors whose works on human relationship I liked) . Then I read this in his interview, and I got my answr.
    ” Trained at Vancouver Film School, Batra’s way of preparing for his own film was by watching screen classics endlessly, and it is through the movies of Billy Wilder, Cameron Crowe, Alexander Payne and especially Woody Allen that he learnt the inner grammar of moviemaking. “I am drawn to the way these directors handle their subject matter. They keep it subtle and never overdramatise a situation. In Cameron Crowe’s book, Conversations With Billy Wilder, there’s a nice line: ‘How would it feel if it happened in real life?’ That was a big lesson. To look at a scene and wonder how it would feel if something like that happened in reality.”

    Batra discovered his first wave of Woody Allen cinema at film school, and while his snooty colleagues were impressed by Bergman and Kubrick, Batra instantly knew he had found his voice. “Watching Woody Allen opened my eyes to what cinema can achieve. I said to myself, ‘This is what I have to do and get better at making my films more real and more about life’.”

    Like

    • Alex adams Says:

      Utkal uncle -your profuse recommendation is making me rethink
      Should have seen EMET after all..
      The bug of Kareena was too much to endure, I guess…

      As for Kareenas ‘appeal’
      That is something I could never see
      But one day i cornered some Asian (male) Kareena admirers
      And tried to analyse what exactly makes her tick
      Their ‘response’ disappointed me even more
      One said-atleast she is so ‘gori’
      Who cares about the ‘rest’ (& has a good body)
      Have nothing against fair or dark or dusky people
      But this sort of mentality is sick

      I mean, even ‘pure’ ‘sexual attraction’ is after all only natural–
      This is perverse 🙂

      To me, she looks like a male face in a female body
      Infact saif may get a ‘shock’ (may have got it already)
      Or maybe he didn’t get the shock
      Since saif himself is an (ex-she-male)
      RNBDJ
      will be interesting what the gender of their kids will be (if at all saif..)
      Hoho 😉

      Like

  42. Alex adams Says:

    Amy
    V-day is over
    Have u still not recovered
    Pray tell us bout your adventures 😉

    Like

  43. This is a fantastic read. I saw the film and fully agree with what you have said. This blog is filled with good writers

    Like

  44. Also I like the way Ami has said-This is the kind of petulant fit that a five year old should be ashamed of throwing- and to have it presented as the triumph of a twenty five year old is just absurd- well observed

    Like

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