The Saddest Song of Them All

This might be the single best piece I have read on Hindi film music; thanks to agyaat and @joycarpediem for sharing (and, I hope Salim is online and sees this post!) — Qalandar

LINK


Excerpt 1: “In Hindi film music, there is too much artifice to arouse pathos: techniques of dramatisation and sentimentality are used to cajole the listener’s sensibility. The problem with Madan Mohan’s ‘Rasm-e-Ulfat’ is that the song hurries the poetry, and Lata Mangeshkar makes it too melodious. In fact, melody is the central problem in Hindi film music; it cushions the effect of sadness, and makes it consumable. A similar problem afflicts a host of Lata songs, from ‘Betab Dil Ki Tamanna’ to ‘Na Koi Umang Hai’ from Kati Patang There is more elegance in songs like ‘Haal-e-dil Yun Unhe Sunaya Gaya’ and ‘Woh Chup Rahe To’, both from Jahan Ara. A gentle air of melancholy pervades ‘Pal Bhar Mein Yeh Kya Ho Gaya’…”

Excerpt 2: “Talat Mahmood and Kishore Kumar are the exact opposite of Rafi and Dey. Talat’s quivering voice is the epitome of sadness. In ‘Phir Wohi Shaam Wohi Gham’ or ‘Zindagi Dene Waale Sun’, he is more involved in the sadness than the singing. But melody chases his despair to prevent him from losing himself completely, and keeps him measured and poised. About Kishore, Zakir Hussain once said the most striking thing ever: When you hear him, you feel as if he is singing for you and you alone. Kishore, perhaps more brilliantly than others, manages to individualise the feeling of pathos, creating an intense, private relationship between himself and the listener. Though he mastered all moods, it is in songs like ‘Badi Sooni, Sooni Hai’, from Mili, or ‘Panthi Hoon Main’ that you find him, completely himself, thoroughly involved in mapping the contours of sadness.”

146 Responses to “The Saddest Song of Them All”

  1. When a person is really sad, can he or she sing?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. One of the most under-rated performances from the great man. If loneliness and hopelessness were to have a face, that would be Amitabh’s in MILI. Period.

    Liked by 2 people

    • It’s one of my very favorite films of his. I’d take this and Jurmana over most of his much more iconic works.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Amitabh’s entry in Jurmana has to be my all-time favorite Bachchan entry…truly outstanding illustration of the Bachchan mythos…

        and since we are talking about music, “Saawan ke Jhoole Paday” from that film is to die for; I hear Bhattacharjee on pathos and melody, but the tune here is not designed to be catchily consumable, and I am always moved by the wistfulness in the stanza beginning “Jab hum mile the piya / hum kitne nadaan the…”

        Liked by 2 people

        • Second you Q. Fantastic song.

          Rocky BEMISAAL is the I can watch endlessly too. Any week-day or week-night. BEMISAAL and a very, very light wine. You don’t need more. His performance itself is one helluva intoxicant.

          One of my favorite songs from BEMISAAL steeped in nostalgia for me is KITNI KHOOBSOORAT YEH TASVEER HAI..

          And then, this below, the gold standard of an actor complimenting the singer and vice-versa..

          Goddamn you guys..bringing up Amitabh on a Monday and I stop working and start listening to Bachchan songs..Got to leave now and save my job..

          Liked by 2 people

        • agreed on the song.. one of my favorite Lata numbers.. like the video a lot too.. Bachchan is fantastic in it.

          Liked by 1 person

    • part of a comment I once left on Bachchan’s blog…

      [Getting back to the topic at hand I find Mili to be the best film among those that deal with ‘disease’. Jaya Bachchan’s performance is fine throughout the film and the director retains a certain ambiguity about the disease here and of course the ending is somewhat open ended. Not just this. The literal disease of the film is placed in an environment of greater social and cultural malaise (disease of the ’soul’..). As I might have said here before the man with the telescope is one of my favorite characters in all of cinema. I continue to believe that this along with Jurmana are among Hrishikesh Mukerjee’s tremendously underrated films. But the man with the telescope living in a penthouse below which operates this diseased bourgeois system, the man who is trying to flee from a horrible scandal involving his parents (which too is kept ambiguous in the sense that we cannot be certain what the truth was..) is a very intriguing character much as the whole setup is marvelously constructed. And of course ‘Mili’ is the only character who can mediate between both worlds. She is literally diseased even as she is the nicest soul in the film and the ending cannot be ‘final’ in any sense because we do not know what will come of this mediation. Anand is of course the more iconic film but I do not think that film even begins to match the intelligence of Mili. Among your works both Mili and Jurmana are among my all time favorites. I can endlessly watch each film.]

      Liked by 1 person

      • Great comment. Agreed about MILI. It’s been a long time since I caught JURMANA again. I am not so sure about the greatness of JURMANA as a film but a fine performance from Amitabh nonetheless.

        So glad Hrishikesh Mukhrjee got Amitabh as his actor in most of his films. Some folks simply bring the best out of you and Hrishkesh was one such for Amitabh.

        The saddest part of Amitabh’s filmography for me from those decades would be the fact the Amitabh was never a part of even a SINGLE Gulzar film. Gulzar, melancholy, Lata, and Amitabh. You NEVER get a combination better than them. Maybe Gulzar did it on purpose or Amitabh was too busy with his stardom. It still baffles me that ‘actors’ like Jeetendra got to act in his films but not Amitabh. Vinod was still okay. And Sanjeev was surely a fine fit in Gulzar’s films.

        From ’90s onwards, it would be the combination of Mani and Amitabh I would yearn for. But that, surely, won’t happen now..

        Liked by 1 person

        • Gulzar’s films also depended on the ordinary hero. Note how Mukherjee was shrewd enough to incorporate Bachchan’s persona or stardom in most of his films. When he didn’t (in something like Alaap) the films didn’t work. Even Mili and Jurmana didn’t do much by Bachchan’s lofty standards though Jurmana did better than Mili.

          Liked by 2 people

      • omrocky786 Says:

        And I can watch Bemisaal endlessly , and consider it way over Jurmana in terms of Bachchan Performance.
        Aside- Saw Houseful, it’s a complete entertainer and a very witty film. Abhishekh has a good role and takes full advantage of it.
        Here he is not like a side actor as he was in HNY. The Bachchan and Aish references are very smartly done.
        Full paisa wasool !!

        Liked by 1 person

        • thanks for your take on the film.. yeah when I saw even Taran and Nahta, hardly Abhishek’s greatest friends, praise him for the film I knew he probably had enough to do here. Not to mention the trailers more or less have the three in every scene and song. Now this might have been ok as a follow-up to BB but it’s probably too little too late at this point (unless the film puts up numbers beyond expectations). I am not surprised by what you’ve said though. On HNY Abhishek got more out of the film than SRK did for sure but again he was ‘secondary’ here in important symbolic ways. The thing is if you go the multistarrer way it should be like BB or at the very least like this Housefull. You can’t have D3 in between or even HNY where there might be enough footage but otherwise the star seems supporting for symbolic reasons.

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    • Yes, Milli is an outstanding film (at once a completely Hindi film; and an inheritor to English novelistic tropes from the 19th century — one might think of it as the cinematic adaptation of a Victorian novel that was never written) and one of the great Bachchan performances…

      Liked by 2 people

  3. omrocky786 Says:

    Q- seems like a good piece…will read it later but just by looking at the songs I see that Bazar got two songs. The entire Bazar album was too good. My personal favorite is – Dekh lo aaj humko…

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    • I was also a bit sore my favorite SD Burman-sung song (from Bandini) didn’t get a mention… but the love for this musical heritage shines through in just about every paragraph of this piece…

      Liked by 1 person

      • I was not bit sore but completely aghast that none of the songs of original umrao jaan were included! The writer must be ignorant. I didn’t read the article.

        Liked by 1 person

  4. MSDhoni Says:

    Rajesh Khanna probably had the saddest lines in umpteen number of songs. Hated him all through childhood only to realize the gem later:

    Do Raaste – Khiza Ke Phool Pe Ati Kabhi Bahaar nahin
    Mere nasib Mein Ai Dost, Tera Pyaar nahin

    Main Roz Lab Pe nai Ek, Aah Rakhataa Huun
    Main Roz Ek naye Gam Ki Raah Takataa Huun

    Garib Kaise Mohabbat, Kare Amiron Se
    BichhaD Gaye Hain Ka_Ii Raanjhe, Apani Hiron Se
    Kisi Ko Apane Muqaddar Pe, Ikhtiyaar nahin
    Mere nasib Mein

    Liked by 2 people

    • omrocky786 Says:

      Rajesh Khanna’s sad songs which are essentially Kishore Kumar songs are epic. My favorite would be-
      Mere naina sawan bhadon
      Humen Zindagi ney maara
      Hazar Rahen mud key dekhi
      main shayar badnaam
      yeh laal rang

      and one of my fav KK song-
      Dekha hai zindagi ko kuch itney kareeb sey ( EMHSK- Dharmendra)

      Like

  5. MSDhoni Says:

    But something which mesmerizes me with each listen are the lines from the song – Zindagi Ka Safar Hai Ye Kaisa Safar , Koi Samjha Nahin Koi Jaana Nahin.

    These lines can melt anyone and at anytime –

    Aise Jeevan Bhi Hain Jo Jiye Hi Nahin
    Jinko Jeene Se Pehle Hi Maut Aa Gayi
    Phool Aise Bhi Hain Jo Khile Hi Nahin
    Jinko Khilne Se Pehle Fiza Kha Gai

    Zindagi Ko Bahut Pyaar Hamne diya
    Maut Se Bhi Mohabbat Nibhaaenge Hum
    Rote Rote Zamaane Mein Aaye Magar
    Hanste Hanste Zamaane Se Jaaenge Hum
    Jaaenge Par Kidhar Hai Kise Ye Khabar
    Koi Samjha Nahin Koi Jaana Nahin

    Liked by 2 people

  6. oldgold Says:

    One is spoilt for choice here. There are too many excellent Sad songs to make a list of.
    Some of Lata’s 50s songs, when her voice was melodious compared to her 60s and later shrieky voice, are incomparable.

    Liked by 2 people

  7. I think these things are subjective. The author seems to be a Kishore Kumar fan and so he is spinning his own tale.

    Like

  8. And since it’s Monday..let me continue with sad songs..

    This is an ALL-TIME-FAVORITE of mine..vintage Talat..

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Justju Jis Ki Thi and Yeh kya jagah hai doston? Someone post links.

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    • Khusrau kehate hai`, ai merī lādo. Khusrau kehate hai`, ai merī lādo.
      Areh dhan dhan bhāg suhāg re. Areh lakhiyā` bābul more. (Refrain)
      Khusrau says, O my darling daughter – may your marriage be blessed
      with everything. O father, why did you part me from you?

      Like

  10. tonymontana Says:

    Too bad we don’t have a critical culture and a repository where such older works can be appreciated after a certain date. Such films released between the biggies of their time lay forgotten. They were not appreciated then, and audience doesn’t bother with them now.

    BTW add Mohammad Aziz to the list of singers who rely on their sadness than singing

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  11. MSDhoni Says:

    Tonymontana agree there but we really need to thank YouTube and technology in general which lets people world over visit and relish these songs lest they would be completely forgotten. You must read few of the comments below these classics and you will notice even the modern generation has absolute respect for such songs / lyrics/ mood and they is a yearning for such songs / lines.

    Further its not a generational thing but fast paced environment which prevents nurturing good lyricists / writers. More than talent its writer’s ‘inwardness’ which can make a Gulzar write – Tujhse Naraaz Nahin Zindagi

    Jeene Ke Liye Sochaa Hi Nahi
    Dard Sambhaalane Honge

    Muskuraaye To, Muskuraane Ke Karz Utarne Honge
    Muskuraauun Kabhii To Lagataa Hai
    Jaise Honthon Pe Karz Rakhaa Hai

    Liked by 1 person

    • Well, at least there’s Irshad Kamil, who has written some amazing lyrics, on par with the best in Hindi film history (“Jo bhi mein kehna chahoon / Barbaad kare alfaaz mere”; a stunning encapsulation of the problem of writing, and a great segue into Bhattacharjee’s piece as well)…

      Like

  12. MSDhoni Says:

    “Jo bhi mein kehna chahoon / Barbaad kare alfaaz mere”

    I doubt people like you or even Satyam have an issue with the above and are adept at conveying in precise words at a fast pace….lol!

    The line is indeed very powerful but as is the norm these days & due to poor singers and then these 2Rs stars mouthing them, everything goes down the drain…..

    Just imagine the results if a Mohit Chauhan or Atif Aslam were to croon – Jeevan Se Bhari Teri Aankhen Majboor Kare Jeene Ke Liye.. …… and its simply not just the heavy baritone which has a intense effect on senses.

    Among the present singers barring Sonu Nigam’s voice, I can hardly invest in a song to be able to advance to the next stage of engulfing myself with the lyrics.

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    • There’s nothing wrong with Mohit Chauhan’s voice. His voice is the closest one can get to experiencing Kishore Kumar’s spirit in this age and time.

      Sonu Nigam is terrific but there’s also Sukhwinder Singh; Kailash Kher is great too…amongst female singers, there’s Sunidhi Chauhan, Neeti Mohan and Shalmali Kholgade just to name a few.

      I’m possibly one of the biggest Kishore/Rafi fans out there but don’t believe in living in the past.

      Even Mika Singh has done a great job in Heer toh badi sad hai… (Tamasha). And I like Arijit Singh too…

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      • And finally, I’d like to repeat once again that Amit Trivedi is a musical genius!

        In Hindi cinema, right now, there’s Amit Trivedi and then there’s everyone else…(with the only exception being ARR!)

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      • Forgot Rahat Fateh Ali Khan and Shankar Mahadevan!

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      • I don’t think the choice is between ‘living in the past’ and not doing so. If we talk about Amitabh Bachchan all the time some people might have a similar response (I’ve faced this many times myself!). If 400 or more years later there is still no dramatist who is considered to be the equal of the Shakespeare (certainly in the Western world) that’s just tough for the competition. I definitely don’t consider any of the singers today to be comparable to titanic talents like Kishore and Rafi and Lata nor do I believe the music is comparable 99% of the time. My only exceptions over the last 40 years (or those who’ve debuted in this period) would be Illaiyaraja and Rahman (as composers) and they’re not from Bollywood. But getting back to the point whatever I might think of some of the singers you’ve mentioned I wouldn’t dream of talking about them in the same breath as Kishore or Rafi. There are always talented singers, even interesting voices (my own favorite male or female at the moment, within the Hindi context, is Shreya Ghoshal.. Nigam might be the best in terms of overall ability though too much of a Rafi clone) but between this and the titan there are very many steps.

        Liked by 1 person

        • the only thing I’d add here is that much as there is a danger in terms of not being critical enough about the past there is an equal one involved in ‘canonizing’ the present too easily.

          Liked by 1 person

        • <i.I definitely don’t consider any of the singers today to be a path on titanic talents like Kishore and Rafi and Lata nor do I believe the music is comparable 99% of the time.

          Different times, different voices! While I have grown up (literally) hearing old melodies sung by Kishore and Rafi (and Lata of course; not to mention Asha Bhosle & Manna Dey!) I can’t complain when I hear tracks composed by Amit Trivedi or sung by Mohit Chauhan and some others. Rockstar is a legendary album because of Mohit Chauhan! There’s Masakalli as well…also Yeh Dooriyan from Love Aaj Kal. I could provide many more examples of songs that I can connect to in spite of being a huge Kishore/Rafi/Lata fan.

          Bear in mind I’m only alluding to one music director out of many in Bollywood and a handful of singers! Amongst the latter, I fully admit that not all their songs are great or even good…one has to separate the wheat from the chaff. Not disputing that for a moment. But to suggest that all hindi music is rubbish is also wrong. I personally can relate to quite a few songs even today and they are as hummable as the golden oldies.

          As to what constitutes in making a titan, that’s a separate debate. Don’t wish to go in there but suffice to say the legends of yore have their place etched in minds…and so do modern greats. The basic nature of evolution (with extra resources being available and past history at its disposal) produces greats as frequently/randomly as ever.

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          • If I had to make a list of my favourite Amit Trivedi soundtracks, I’m sure the list would easily cross 30…and he has been working in Bollywood for about 8-9 years!

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          • I love Amit Trivedi at his best — Dev D, Lootera — but he is at that peak quite infrequently… Lootera in particular is a masterpiece of wistful tone…

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          • Qalandar, if you are into alternative/fusion music you should check out Amit Trivedi’s songs from MTV Coke Studio. Some nice gems there.

            I’ve listened to almost all Amit Trivedi albums by now and there are very few albums where I haven’t liked at least one song quite a lot!

            Having said that, his biggest commercial hit as a music director(Shaandaar) isn’t one of my favourites. I like the title track and perhaps Nazdeekiyan but seriously wonder what’s the fuss about the monster hit Gulaabo

            Maybe I should do a countdown of my favourite Amit Trivedi songs someday!

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          • you should do a post on this.. or put up a list here and I’ll make a post out of it.

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          • Yes — Shandaar isn’t quirky, and Trivedi just isn’t Trivedi without quirkiness…

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          • Satyam: will do!

            I’m not a trained musician or anything and I admit to having a bias towards vocals, but in this case, I’m inspired enough to write about a composer whose songs form an integral part of my personal playlist!

            The only negative thing I’d say about Amit Trivedi is that Amit Trivedi, the singer, isn’t a patch on Amit Trivedi the composer!

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          • Shaandaar (the little I heard) was pure filth, esp by trivedi standards.
            One shouldn’t try to be some1 else. Here trivedi tried to do a Preetam -but fell flat on his face.

            (& lets be clear–even trivedi is no Rahman!) not even close

            Incidentally one trivedi sound that has been criminally under rated (like the movie) & which by his own admission took the effort of many albums and I loved it was-
            Bombay velvet …
            Give it a chance

            Like

          • To be honest I only gave Bombay Velvet a quick listen, and wasn’t impressed, but might be worth re-visiting…

            Like

          • Bombay Velvet was never going to be everyone’s cup of tea… given that it’s a mix of 60s Jazz and RnB.

            I would be lying if I said that I love the album but there are at least 2 tracks that I quite like:

            1) Mohabbat Buri Bimari (Shalmali Kholgade version)

            2) The Bombay Velvet Theme music…really powerful

            Like

          • At the risk of seriously hijacking the discussion (if it’s not been done already!) here’s the entire soundtrack of Udta Punjab

            Ikk Kudi (Track #3) is instantly likeable (nice vocals by Shahid Mallya). Overall the soundtrack is slightly reminiscent of Amit Trivedi’s own No One Killed Jessica in the sense that it’s quite trippy (not as trippy as Dev D though) and has a certain ‘edginess’ to it…I guess that’s keeping in mind the subject matter of the film.

            Overall, It’s another example of the ‘range’ that he possesses. From Lootera to Bombay Velvet to Dev D to Kai Po Che to Ek Main Ek Tu to Ishaqzaade…the list keeps on growing!

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  13. Sanjana:

    Old song by Ghantasala and P. Leela. The images are used to convey the meaning of the lyrics. It is only for those who can understand telugu. One of the saddest songs sung soulfully and melodiously by the legendary singers.

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    • This will be a long list
      One that comes into my mind – will rank amongst the best in any list
      The music composition, vocals, setting are perfect
      Haven’t seen this film
      But ranked it one of the best compositions ever from Bollywood.
      It haunts humbles me.
      Gave it apex’ stamp

      Then only recently I came to know that it’s also THE most favorite song ever of Indias premier singer in her career of more than 60 years.

      Lag Jaa gale/woh Kaun thi

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  14. Nafrat ki duniya chod ke pyar ki duniya me khush rehna mere yaar..in Hathi Mere Sathi would rank one of the saddest in my list…
    Nice article..Thanks for linking…

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  15. If possible, don’t pay too much attention to the visuals of the song — the music doesn’t deserve the association…but do listen to the melancholy tune that is a permanent fixture in this song. It also helps that Anusha Mani’s vocals are so soothing to the ears. This is one of my absolute favorite songs!

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  16. This is another gem from one of the all time great albums IMO:

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    • Wrong link!

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    • Another Bhupinder gem:

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      • neither of these two songs dil dhundhata and ek akela, qualify as sad. A sad song should instantly make you cry. The two song you posted make me depressed but no tears. 😦

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      • These 2 from Bhupinder are melancholic, but not sad.

        Especially, Dil Dhoondta Hai.. the music, melody, voice of Dil Dhoondta Hai has this unique melancholic or nostalgic (depending upon how one views past memories) effect. It fires an instant kaleidoscope of memories in the mind, from the very beginning of one’s life. Its like an odd ‘road’ song when listened to whilst visiting places from the past. Arse ke baad, jab log miltey hain, un galiyon-nukkadon mein jahan, jahaan barson se kadam nahi rakhein hon…

        Liked by 1 person

        • Kavi ji…aise topic par aap apna vishleshan hee pesh kar rahe ho?

          Aapko bhi apni pasandeeda gaanon ka izhaar karna chahiye!

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          • All u good folks have covered the gamut of Sad songs, zyada kuch raha nahi. Few like these perhaps:

            Sad version of Rote Hue with Rafi singing:

            Another Kishore gem:

            BitterSweet, not all sad:

            Another one not at depth of sadness, but quite piercing:

            A favorite which used to keep playing on Aakashvaani in the good ole days:

            So many other Rafi sad gems:

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          • I prepared a long list, but guess it did not go thru with too many youtube links.
            But here goes again:

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          • Bittersweet, not very sad:

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          • Another fav, though not tear-jerking but very haunting and reminiscent of past love:

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          • This one always brings tears, BigB jo hai is mein. But Rafi really brought out the sadness as a foil to Kishore’s messianic version:

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          • Brilliant one from Rafi:

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          • Not sad but pierces the heart, off course again Rafi:

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          • And a treasure trove of Rafi’s sad ones here in this link!

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          • And this treasure from Kishoreda:

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          • Some lovely reccos, Nykavi ji…am a big fan of Kya Hua Tera Vaada and also Sach Mere Yaar Hai

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  17. MSDhoni Says:

    All great songs each better than ones posted earlier. Songs are what connects us to Hindi movies…..at least to me they are never a hindrance / barrier to story telling.

    Amit Trivedi started off well with Dev D and that song Iktaara from Wake Up Sid is simply brilliant. Also really liked the funky tunes of Aisha …..Aisha tracks came out of the blue …similar to how Rahman popped up with Roja……… but somewhere lost him and sorry to say I am simply no fan of BV kind of music at all.

    Coming to great Bhupinder Singh……Dil Dhoondhta and few other songs of his and mostly pictured on Amol Palekar are my go to songs if an emotional crisis of identity and self-confidence is occurring esp. during periods of transition. I love both slower and the fast version of this song and it also has my fav Sanjeev Kumar in the background ….so double bonanza. The filming of the fast version of Dil Dhoondhta with time passing by is simply excellent !

    Unfortunately Bhupinder never got his rightful due since Kishore- Rafi- Mukesh trio had monopolized and mesmerized their audience to pay any attention to other singer of that era to make a mark. But I am a big Bhupinder Singh fan !

    Liked by 1 person

    • Agree with you on Bhupinder…he had such a unique voice. His songs were mostly philosophical and had a nostalgia-induced sadness attached to them. Dil Dhoondta Hai… is one of my all time favourite songs and Mausam one of the greatest musical collaborations ever in the history of Hindi cinema.

      Like

  18. sad love song

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    • Sad, this isn’t…more celebratory than sad where the two get together in spite of their cultural differences.

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      • really? I thought both died in the end…and it was sad story…this whole song is sad song because they cannot meet. See the visuals to confirm that

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  19. Sad songs or moody songs?
    Pyaasa comes to mind and also Anupama.

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  20. Anand Milind copied Ilayaraja in Dil:

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  21. I remember watching this secretly on Doordarshan adult movie night😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • oldgold Says:

      Loved ABsr in this film. Actually felt very very sad throughout the film because of his unrequitted love brought out in this song. LOL

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      • Muqaddar Ka Sikander was a modern reworking of Devdas where the ‘hero’ was no longer a loser. Rekha plays the role of Chandramukhi whereas Rakhee plays Paro with a role reversal of sorts…Paro belongs to a rich family whereas Sikander is poor to begin with.

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        • Kaun kambakht bardaasht karne ko peeta hai …
          hum toh peete hai ki yahan par baith sake,
          tumhe dekh sake,
          tumhe bardaasht kar sake

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        • oldgold Says:

          Yes. And the song from Devdas ‘Mitva’ is a depressing and sad song rolled into one with Talats voice doing it full justice.

          Liked by 1 person

    • Re.-I remember watching this secretly on Doordarshan adult movie night😉
      Udta Munna tharkee !! LOL
      Aside- Superb thread and some great songs being posted here !!

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  22. Speaking of cognitive dissonance, this song is ‘sad’ but has been given the opposite treatment. This is quite intentional and has been confirmed by Imtiaz Ali as well.

    In the end, the audience isn’t sure how to feel about the period of time this song covers. One can obviously see Deepika looking and feeling sad but the song not only trivialises the situation, it actually pokes fun at it (pyaar ki loo main itni jal gayi….’loo’ main jaana mushkil hai )

    I think it’s a brilliant song…very well sung by Mika Singh. He captures the ‘highs’ quite well.

    Liked by 1 person

  23. Ankhiyon ke Jarakhon Se was one heck of a tearjerker movie from the past. The title song is rated as one of the most romantic songs of bwood:

    And the sad versions (one link posted in a thread above) are just absolute tear jerkers. Ravindra Jain’s music, with Hemlata’s voice, plus good perfs from Sachin/Ranjeeta.

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    • Yes, Ankhiyon Ke Jarokhon Se is a pretty good song. I think this is Ranjeeta’s peak moment in Bollywood. I’ve surprised myself by remembering her!

      But jokes aside, she was pretty good in this film.

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  24. jayshah Says:

    some of my favs much lop-sided to 80s/90s/00s/10s – whether they actually all qualify as sad i don’t know but they sound sad generally
    Tu Hi Re – Bombay
    Yaad Teri Aati Hai – Afsana Pyar Ka
    Kahin to hogi ho – JTYJN
    Jiye To Jiye Kaise – Saajan
    Tanhayee – DCH
    Ye Dooriyan – Love Aaj Kal
    Kal Ho Na Ho – KHNH
    Lag Ja Gale Ki Phir Ye – Who Kaun Thi
    Chitthi Aai Hai – Naam
    Tadap Tadap Ke & HDDCS – HDDCS
    Na Ja Ne Mere – DDLJ
    Maa & TZP – TZP
    Tere Naam – Tere Naam
    KANK – KANK
    Chaha Hai Tujko – Maan
    Sandese aate Hai – Border
    Laakh Duniya Kahe – Talaash
    Ye Rabba – Salaam – E – Ishq
    Kaise Mujhe Tum Mil Gaye – Ghajini
    Tere Liya – Veer Zaara
    Jag soona soona lage – Om shanti Om
    Yeh Jo Des Hai Tera – Swades

    Great topic – nothing beats a sad song IMO!

    Like

    • Kahin To Hogi Woh is awesome…ARR at his best!

      Jane na kahan woh duniya hai
      jaane na woh hai bhi ya nahi
      jahan meri zindagi mujhse
      itni khafa nahi…

      Like

  25. Don’t know if anybody likes this, but this one melts me and makes me catch the first flight back but then I remember that’s it’s Modi’s intolerant/facist BJP, and I decide I would rather stay put under Trump’s benevolent GOP.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Trump hasn’t been elected yet and I don’t believe he will be. But leaving this aside if you aren’t going to be a minority in Modi’s India and will be one in Trump’s US you should opt for the former. If you’ll be some sort of minority either way well that’s a tough break! I’d still however take US institutional guarantees over Indian ones!

      It’s always might amusing to see commentary from so many quarters where one has huge problems with the Republicans and the Tea Party and Palin and Trump and so on (rightly so) but one then immediately turns around and says that all criticism of Modi or the BJP is an exaggeration or whatever. This when they belong to the same side of the political divide and if anything the consequences of these things are much worse in India, precisely because of poorer institutional guarantees. Much as the same folks talk about police brutality and racism in the US (again rightly so in many instances) but India would beat the US on race/caste grounds by an order of magnitude. We’re not even on the same planet in terms of this disparity. But again no one has a problem here. ‘Hey why are you trying to stain India’s reputation?’ is the usual refrain!

      So the argument completely switches on different sides. It’s like folks putting up all kinds of news stories and twitter feeds and what not simply to confirm what they already believe. Without any attention given to the the integrity (or lack thereof) of the source and so forth.

      To paraphrase Bill Clinton here ‘it’s the identity stupid’! One tends to feel rather more threatened with right-wing politics in certain instances than in others. Once again… ‘it’s the minority stupid’!

      Liked by 3 people

      • oldgold Says:

        *Like*

        Like

      • Thanks for this reply Satyam; though I never guessed a passing comment of mine would touch such a nerve and a response. I have all the answers for this response; but wouldn’t want to clog this thread with politics. Mr. Saket might feel offended because of my ‘right-winger’ frustrations. And yes, I do agree, pre-emptively, that maybe I shouldn’t have alluded to politics here.

        I will reply, if you feel I am not polluting this thread. As of now, I will stay away.

        With due respect, Satyam, these are age-old arguments with neither novelty nor any respect to changing political dynamics and the checks and balances of modern democracies.

        I will stop at that & continue posting one of my favorite songs from a defining film of the ’90s.

        Like

        • jayshah Says:

          80s (sorry!!!)

          Liked by 1 person

        • Never thought of you as a right winger…or even ‘frustrated’. I’ve only had positive interactions with you here.

          Like

        • “though I never guessed a passing comment of mine would touch such a nerve and a response”

          C’mon An Jo, that’s a nice rhetorical strategy! One keeps quoting certain kinds of things and when quizzed one says ‘hey what happened here?’!

          I’m not calling you a right-winger. I am raising a question that is in a way beyond politics and about consistency. By the way I’ve raised this question before others also and have yet to receive a persuasive answer. How is it possible that one can have all the problems in the world with the Republicans and none with the BJP in India? It’s like saying one is a huge fan of the Dems in the US but is otherwise an equally big fan of the Tories in Britain. It just doesn’t happen! Unless one is going to deny that the BJP is a right-wing party one is really trying to square a circle here. It’s not about getting into specifics or something. Just doesn’t stand to reason. I’ve offered other examples in the past too. If I don’t like a certain kind of strongman I reject equally Modi or Erdogan. I don’t say I have a problem with Modi but I’m ok with the latter. And so on. Again this isn’t about one policy or the other. It’s about something much more elementary. The only other point I’d make is (and again I’ve made it for years) and which isn’t once again about a specific point is that it’s very easy to keep quoting those on twitter or elsewhere which whom one already agrees. Those on the other side do the same. Not sure if it really makes one’s point. It’s one thing to put up thoughtful opinion pieces and quite another to put up the kinds of attacks that constantly come up on twitter or elsewhere. you are free to do so, that’s not what I’m contesting. And once more this isn’t a political debate. It is however one about consistency. Finally nowhere in the world have things changed to such a degree that people have a problem figuring out what party is right of center and which one is left of it. But even beyond this no one has a problem figuring out what party is or has been responsible for what kinds of violence though in EVERY SINGLE CASE the adherents have similar excuses to explain away things.

          Like

    • This song makes me feel the same way (melts me and makes me catch the first flight back). These days people in india are not patriotic the way they used to be in my time. Modi is rare speciman from those ideal bygone days…..baki sab deemak ki tarah desh ko khokla karr rahe hai.

      Like

    • oldgold Says:

      I love this song.
      Another one – not a sad song but also from the same film ‘Ganga aye kahan se’ in Hemant Kumar’s voice is also very impressive.

      Like

    • AnJo bhai IMO you should relocate to Bangladesh, Pakistan, Kashmir , Saudi Arabia etc.. – all minorities are very safe there.

      Like

  26. This one is a favourite of mine purely because of Mohit Chauhan’s vocals…kind of mirrors the film as well (Love Aaj Kal). Basically, crap film but awesome music.

    Back to the song itself, Mohit Chauhan’s unique voice shines in this love ballad, which is kinda sad…so suitable for this thread. Even if it isn’t, I’d still push it anyway!

    Sometimes (and very few times) Pritam surprises you and how!

    Like

    • The common thread (no pun intended) connecting most, if not all, of the songs posted here goes back to the director (not just the music director) of the film. Great music doesn’t exist in a vacuum.

      In other words, go searching for a well-known director and you’ll end up discovering great songs as well. Now most of these directors may not be musically gifted but they are the ones with great taste. And it’s this musical intuition that is responsible for that extra creative spark that makes music everlasting!

      Liked by 1 person

  27. For many decades, Lata Mangeshkar, you, Mohammed Rafi, Kishore Kumar, Manna De virtually monopolised the Bollywood playback singing industry.
    True, you were all very talented and at the top of your game, but do you regret having such a monopoly where just a few artistes like you controlled the industry, a sort of exclusive club?

    No, we did not control… There was no singer like Lata, no singer like Kishore, Rafi, or Mukesh. And until now, there is nobody. Nobody with that kind of voice, nobody with that kind of brain to learn. Not only to learn, but to improvise.

    We improvised music, we improvised the songs. Nowadays, they just listen and copy.

    We would listen, and then we would be thinking what do we do with this song, how to innovate, how to improvise.

    Nowadays, people don’t want to learn the correct pronunciation, all those things. We know that, but not the people now. We would improvise on the spot while singing and that’s what made our songs so popular.

    Some people would argue that that monopoly is now broken in Bollywood. There are dozens of versatile singers.
    Today on television channels, they have music talent searches, young talent from villages and the inner cities of India have the opportunity to gain recognition and find a place in Bollywood’s playback singing industry.
    Are you happy that the industry has become more diversified? Or do you feel the old traditions are being compromised?

    But the monopoly is not broken. Yes, Rafi, Kishore is not there. Didi is old and except me, there are no old singers. But the monopoly is not broken because the new singers, they can’t sing good…

    What about the talent you see on these television shows? Aren’t you impressed by any of them?

    They are only singing our songs. They are listening to our songs more than 50 times and memorising and singing them. They are singing correct when they are singing them 50 times over.

    So I am thinking, they can copy, but they are not original.

    For them, it is just a business, this kind of singing — copying and singing the songs.

    http://www.rediff.com/movies/report/exclusive-asha-bhosle-to-retire/20160711.htm

    Like

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