Image from Bahubali: The Conclusion

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14 Responses to “Image from Bahubali: The Conclusion”

  1. Baahubali for me was the biggest Movie of the decade. The sequel has the potential to beat that.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Naveen I echo your thought & even if it turns out half as good its predecessor, we are going to witness tsunami at the box office. It has potential to touch 900 Crore worldwide bettering PK’s record & if it exceeds audience’s expectations, 1000 Crore is also a possibility. Hope it turns out to be at least as entertaining as the first one.

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  2. Bahubali was like Black
    Kitna hype, movie bas theek-thaak !!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Nahin yaar I loved Bahubali!

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      • I liked it as well, went with three other families , all the ladies ( no exception ) did not like it at all , a few guys were neutral as well.
        Aside- People going gaa ga over Bahubali reminds me of the line an IT guy maroed at a social gathering couple of years back-
        “Big Data is like High School sex, everyone talks about it but very few have experienced it.”

        At that time I had no clue saala Big Data hota kya hai ..lol

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  3. Maybe because I watched it on TV and kept waiting for it to take a turn to something spectacular due to the hype it got during theatre release. Watched a rerun to make sure i did not miss anything.
    Still wondering wtf?

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    • On big screen, Baahubali was magical transporting us to some fairytale world. These types of films wont work on regular tv. You cant compare Baahubali to Kabali. Kabali is strictly for Rajni fans.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Same with that bunk Kabali. A complete waste of time and incomprehensible.

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  5. Yes same here Robot was fantastic and first time found Aishwarya very lovable in a movie …may be it was due to her chubbiness and right amount of curves. Even after the age difference the chemistry worked well.

    Another great watch was Makkhi ( Eega ) though it was stretched towards the end. Sivaji too was not bad when it started but then it became too flaky and took a flight to disbelief.

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    • Makhkhi was good.
      I could not find Hindi DVD for Sivaji at the time and then lost interest.
      Re.- Bahubali- 2-, I am looking forward coz. of Tamanna !!

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      • I watch most of these movies when they are running on cable as now one can rewind TV up to a week and catch up on all channels.

        Tamanna is a fairly tale until she opens her gab. What an unsexy voice on that mermaid! After looking at her initially I really thought Sajid Khan was right when he introduced her in Himmatwala as the next madhuri of hindi cinema…..but she has an awful dialogue delivery. It’s similar to those beautiful Spanish dames on TV until they start talking …. Soy muy hermoso….te quiero…. 🙂 🙂

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  6. One great thing about southern cinema whether they are good or bad, the story moves pretty fast. One scene after the other…also they have very innovative back and forth (confrontations) between the hero and the villain (some sort of wild imagination)

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  7. http://www.filmcompanion.in/article/anand-neelakantan-taking-baahubali-from-screen-to-books-interview?utm_content=bufferf7c70&utm_medium=social&utm_source=twitter.com&utm_campaign=buffer

    A recent study concluded that filmmaker S S Rajamouli’s Baahubali: The Conclusion is the most awaited Indian film of 2017. Surprisingly, it comfortably edged out films powered by superstars like Shah Rukh Khan and Salman Khan. The question that’s been haunting Baahubali fans since 2015 is of course – Why did Kattapa kill Baahubali?

    Before you find the answer to that in April, author Anand Neelakantan will release his book The Rise of Sivagami, a prequel to the movie next month. Published by Westland, the book is the first of a trilogy that will explore the early life of queen Sivagami and royal servant Kattapa. The last book will stop at the point where the 2015 film begins. Neelakantan, who is known for his best-selling books like Asura that re-interpret Indian mythology, unveiled the cover of his book at the 10th Jaipur Literature Festival. He speaks to Film Companion about the challenge of writing characters that are already popular and how his trilogy will add to the Baahubali experience.

    Excerpts:

    You’ve said that S S Rajamouli would grade you after each chapter. Sometimes you got as less as 2 out of 10. Were you comfortable with this writing process?

    SS Rajamouli is a big director and this is great exposure for me. He read my book Asura and called me. He asked me to imagine certain scenes and write them. Then and there I sat and wrote some random scenes about new characters. In fact, 80 per cent of the characters in the book are not in the film. I wrote about 20 scenes and then he started marking. I shouldn’t tell you how bad the ones I got a 2 for were. Rajamouli asked me to include only the scenes that were a 7 on 10 and above.

    Since I write for TV, I am used to working like this. It’s very normal for me. I have written TV shows like Siya Ke Ram and Ashoka and there you write for TRPs.

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