Archive for the the good Category

Qalandar Reviews O KADHAL KANMANI (Tamil; 2015)

Posted in the good with tags , , , , , , , , , , , on April 19, 2015 by Qalandar


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EXCERPT: “And yet, by the end of O Kadhal Kanmani, I realized that I might have been missing the point of the film: Bombay, beautiful Bombay, in its real and cinematic avatars, appears to be the raison d’être of this film, and perhaps the most plausible kanmani on offer. Not for nothing does the film begin with Dulquer’s Aditya Varadarajan disembarking at CST/Victoria Terminus, and catching sight of Nithya Menon’s Tara, her image framed, de-stabilized, and finally obscured by passing trains in possibly the best train shots of even Ratnam’s long career. Indeed, over the course of the film the couple seems to meet more often in BEST buses and local trains than seems plausible for the iPad and iPhone wielding yuppies these two seem to be, and the reason is surely that O Kadhal Kanmani is Ratnam’s paean to a city that he loves, in the manner one loves a city one has discovered later in life, too late, that is, to take for granted. As with so many films from decades ago, the city’s lodestars are (apart from CST) the Gateway of India, the Worli sea-face, and the public transport system, each of these sites charged with years of not just social but cinematic meaning that made the experience of watching them on-screen moving in a way quite independent of the unfolding love story. The romance, in short, serves as backdrop to Ratnam’s representation of a city he clearly loves.”
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Why Bollywood is like the Congress Party (Rohan Sippy)

Posted in the good on April 9, 2015 by Satyam

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Furious 7 is breaking box office records for Hollywood films in India. It has beaten The Amazing Spiderman for the biggest opening for a Hollywood film, and looks like it is also the highest grossing film in any language in India in 2015. With Rs 50 crore net over the opening weekend (Thursday to Sunday), the movie has grossed more than three times what the new Hindi release Detective Byomkesh Bakshy! recorded. Hollywood’s non-tentpole films are also growing impressively, so it’s a good time as any to speculate on how our Hindi industry is doing.

for more follow the link..

Interview with NH-10’s Navdeep Singh

Posted in the good with tags , , , , , , , , , on March 29, 2015 by Qalandar

Thanks to agyaat for pointing me to this interview — love Nh-10 or hate it, Navdeep Singh’s passion and bitterness does shine through here. The bit about the censor board’s elitism, determined to protect “the masses” from thinking for itself, convinced that only “educated” folk can be trusted with representations of violence, is not only absurd but ironic for those of us who have seen NH-10, given the mess the “educated” Arjun lands the leading couple in. — Qalandar

EXCERPT: “You had to fight with the Censor Board to get the film released. What were you told to cut?
Words like randi, saali, kutti were cut. We were allowed to show the word “randi” scribbled on the wall, but nobody could speak it. We were told to tone down the fights in the honour killing scene and when Meera (Sharma) gets beaten up in the sarpanch’s house. The second time when Meera sees the word “randi” written on the wall after her husband dies, we were asked to cut the shot from six seconds to three seconds. I asked the board members why we had to cut it the second time when it was allowed the first time in the bathroom scene, and the answer was that the first time she erases it. That’s so arbitrary! But the first time we went for the censor certificate, half the members wanted to ban the film.

Read the complete interview HERE

A Note on NH-10 (Hindi; 2015)

Posted in the good with tags , , , , , , on March 20, 2015 by Qalandar

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There was a fair amount in the NH-10 trailers that I find off-putting about contemporary Bollywood: the utterly (and to me, somewhat alienating) Hollywood cinematic idiom, the sense that the film’s audience must share the socio-economic aspirations of the two lead characters, the sort of de-racinated upwardly mobile Indians presented as normal, almost the only “normal” in a milieu where to be “ethnic” is to be associated with violence and deprivation’s dark heart. Director Navdeep Singh’s film (his second, after the atmospheric Chinatown remake Manorama Six Feet Under) certainly pushes those buttons, but there’s much more to the film, making it one of the best (and certainly the most harrowing) Hindi films of the last few months. Continue reading

Utkal on Rajesh Khanna

Posted in the good on March 5, 2015 by Satyam


There have been superstars before Rajesh Khnna: Dilp Kumar, Dev An and, Shammi Kapoor. There has been superstars after Rajesh Khanna: Amitabh Bachchan, Shahrukh Khan, Salman Khan. But if you haven’t been a teenager between 1969-1972, you will never know what star hysteria is really like. Well, India never had an Elvis, or the Beatles. But there was Rajesh Khanna.
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The incomparable Amitabh – My diary of a passionate engagement over two decades (Utkal)

Posted in the good on March 3, 2015 by Satyam

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The year 1971. I am in the final year of school, right in the center of the Hindi heartland, in Raipur, eating, drinking and dreaming Hindi films. After a spate of super hits, the then heartthrob of Indian film lovers, Rajesh Khanna, has delivered some okey-dokey films. And then came Anand. We were all zapped. What a film! What a performance! And who won’t be touched by ‘ Kahin Door Jab Din Dhal Jaaye’ or ‘ Zindagi kaise Yeh Paheli Hai’ ? The superstar had redeemed himself. But amidst all this, we also talked of the character called ‘ Babu Moshai’ and an actor called Amitabh Bachchan. His performance too was praiseworthy, we all agreed. Looking back, Little did anyone realize that like the slayer of Kamsa being born in the prison cell of the Mathura king, the man who would dethrone the superstar, had got his definitive break in the triumphant comeback film of the superstar himself. Come to think of it, the Angry Young Man was born in Anand itself. ” Bolte kuyn nahin ho? Pichhle ten mahinese bak bak karte mere sar kha gaye ho. Ab chup kyuon ho? ‘ The way Amitabh delivered those lines, the intensity, the total concentration, it was never done before in Indian films. But we quickly forgot him and looked at actors like Navin Nischal ( Sawan Bhadon, Prawana) and Anil Dhawan ( Chetna, Piya Ka ghar) as the big stars of the next generation. ( Dharmendra was already a big star rivalling Rajesh Khanna with hits like Mera Gaon Mera Desh and Seeta Aur Geeta. ) .
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Saket on Shamitabh

Posted in the good on March 2, 2015 by Satyam

Saw Shamitabh the other day. As a film, it has its cute little moments and enough mirth to leave a positive impression. But it always nagged me that there was more to the film. It’s decidedly Meta in its name – and here’s my theory – it’s Balki’s open-ended question to all film aficionados: what would have happened to Amitabh Bachchan –the actor – without his famous baritone?
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